offeree


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offeree

n. a person or entity to whom an offer to enter into a contract is made by another (the offeror).

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Nevertheless it is not clear whether the offeree could use electronic mail to communicate his acceptance when the offeror has electronically mailed the offer to him, or when the offeror has sent the offer via fax or telex with the electronic mail address in the letter head.
Earlier jurisprudence strengthened this conclusion, as it was "the tendency of courts to treat offers as calling for bilateral rather than unilateral action when the language can be fairly so construed." (66) As a unilateral contract might be revoked at anytime before complete performance, many courts had adopted a "promissory construction where that can be reasonably given." (67) A bilateral agreement enabled the parties "to close a business bargain on the strength of which they may, thereafter, plan their courses." (68) Once the court transformed the unilateral offer into a bilateral contract, "the offeror is bound if the offeree performs or is willing to perform." (69) In a bilateral situation, the contract formed immediately and both parties were bound to carry out their obligations.
offeree has "effective access" to the information about the
In other words the offer must therefore set out the exact essential and material terms of the proposed agreement in order to be unequivocally acceptable by the offeree. Our courts have been extremely reluctant in declaring agreements that are either vague or incomplete as a valid enforceable agreements (Kantor v.
In addition, the offer must effectively communicate all material terms to the offeree.
"In the absence of fraud, the fact that an offeree cannot read, write, speak, or understand the English language is immaterial to whether an English-language agreement the offeree executes is enforceable."
(2) The result is that, for Rule 68(b) purposes, both the offeror and offeree are credited with the prior payment to the extent of their own contributory fault.
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules prohibit such private placements from being discussed unless the offeree has been pre-qualified for the investment.
what he has offered, nor the offeree's actual understanding of what
A unique approach is the "push-pull" method, whereby the departing owner sets the value and the remaining owners can either accept this price or require the offerer to buy out the offeree. In any case, the agreement should specifically define its terms, using "income," for example, in the context of a formula using a multiplier of earnings.
An offeror is the person who makes an offer; the offeree is the person to whom the offer is made.