offhandedness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparison was unexpected and intriguing, and when explored further serves not only to amplify differences between two buildings of similar scale, function and location, but also differences between two modes of architectural practice; between the discipline of an architect like Piano (who believes that artists in all fields should perfect and rehearse known techniques), and the self-confessed offhandedness of Fretton (who seems to rely much more on experience and intuition).
And unfortunately, he did so, with a casual and brutal offhandedness." One of the things Watson said at a departmental meeting, by Wilson's recollection, was that Harvard administrators would be "out of their minds" to hire another ecologist.
Offhandedness, slowness and impersonality are likely to lose you not only that customer but many others as well--bad news spreads.
By The Way, despite its self-conscious offhandedness, is a genuine start.
Their offhandedness and ingratitude is quite heartless but Rachel has soldiered on gamely, even when all her efforts were studiously ignored.
Half-assed is more like it." Always, he offered his comments good-naturedly, with a disarming, just-a-joke offhandedness. But he'd rarely go shopping in the stores.
Urbanites inclined to dismiss such radical shifts in the social landscape as the inevitable product of merciless economics should stop to consider the high social cost that comes with such offhandedness. A keen observer need look no farther than Oklahoma City to know what the price is.
The Grey Gallery show was a broad, but clearly focused overview that intensified your sense of the simultaneous individuality and offhandedness of the photographer-filmmaker's idiosyncratic point of view not only because it isolated particular aspects of his work, but also because it placed it in the context of his colleagues' efforts in other disciplines.
Despite its seeming offhandedness, this request--"`If you see Nick, dear, will you tell him his mother wants to see him?'"--carries the weight of a command, its oft-noted syntax singularly appropriate to a relationship between social unequals, that mistress and servant, perhaps, or parent and child (SS 102).