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OFFICE. An office is a right to exercise a public function or employment, and to take the fees and emoluments belonging to it,. Shelf. on Mortm. 797; Cruise, Dig. Index, h.t.; 3 Serg. & R. 149.
     2. Offices may be classed into civil and military.
     3.-1. Civil offices may be classed into political, judicial, and ministerial.
     4.-1. The political offices are such as are not connected immediately with the administration of justice, or the execution of the mandates of a superior officer; the office of the president of the United States, of the heads of departments, of the members of the legislature, are of this number.
     5.-2. The judicial offices are those which relate to the administration of justice, and which must be exercised by persons of sufficient skill and experience in the duties which appertain to them.
     6.-3. Ministerial offices are those which give the officer no power to judge of the matter to be done, and require him to obey the mandates of a superior. 7 Mass. 280. See 5 Wend. 170; 10 Wend. 514; 8 Vern. 512; Breese, 280. It is a general rule, that a judicial office cannot be exercised by deputy, while a ministerial may.
     7. In the United, States, the tenure of office never extends beyond good behaviour. In England, offices are public or private. The former affect the people generally, the latter are such as concern particular districts, belonging to private individuals. In the United States, all offices, according to the above definition, are public; but in another sense, employments of a private nature are also called offices; for example, the office of president of a bank, the office of director of a corporation. For the incompatibility of office, see Incompatibility; 4 S. & R. 277; 4 Inst. 100; Com. Dig. h.t., B. 7; and vide, generally, 3 Kent, Com. 362; Cruise, Dig. tit. 25; Ham. N. P. 283; 16 Vin. Ab. 101; Ayliffe's Parerg. 395; Poth. Traite des Choses, Sec. 2; Amer. Dig. h.t.; 17 S. & R. 219.
     8.-2. Military offices consist of such as are granted to soldiers or naval officers.
     9. The room in which the business of an officer is transacted is also called an office, as the land office. Vide Officer.

OFFICE, INQUEST OF. An examination into a matter by an officer in virtue of his office. Vide Inquisition.

References in classic literature ?
Because the Circumlocution Office went on mechanically, every day, keeping this wonderful, all-sufficient wheel of statesmanship, How not to do it, in motion.
Numbers of people were lost in the Circumlocution Office. Unfortunates with wrongs, or with projects for the general welfare
No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States; and no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
In the first room as you enter you will find the office servant; in the second, the under-clerks; the private office of the second head-clerk is to the right or left, and further on is that of the head of the bureau.
Can I be not fit for my office? No, I must certainly not say that I cannot see the cloth!'
'Well, you have an office of your own in this building, I believe.'
I can tell you (this is, of course, strictly between ourselves) that the authorities at my office took his advice in a Government case that puzzled the police.
The silver heart left the office, swinging and banging itself independently against the office furniture as it indignantly departed.
A THIRD objection to the Senate as a court of impeachments, is drawn from the agency they are to have in the appointments to office. It is imagined that they would be too indulgent judges of the conduct of men, in whose official creation they had participated.
"Is this young gentleman one of the 'prentices or articled ones of your office?" asked the turnkey, with a grin at Mr.
He was roused by a touch on the shoulder, and a request from the man with the keys to follow him into the office. He closed his book hastily; and was at once ushered into the imposing presence of the renowned Mr.
The only fame of my poem which reached me was when another boy in the office quoted some lines of it in derision.

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