offspring


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This point, if it could be cleared up, would be interesting; if, for instance, it could be shown that the greyhound, bloodhound, terrier, spaniel, and bull-dog, which we all know propagate their kind so truly, were the offspring of any single species, then such facts would have great weight in making us doubt about the immutability of the many very closely allied and natural species--for instance, of the many foxes--inhabiting different quarters of the world.
The offspring from the first cross between two pure breeds is tolerably and sometimes (as I have found with pigeons) extremely uniform, and everything seems simple enough; but when these mongrels are crossed one with another for several generations, hardly two of them will be alike, and then the extreme difficulty, or rather utter hopelessness, of the task becomes apparent.
The proper officers will take the offspring of the good parents to the pen or fold, and there they will deposit them with certain nurses who dwell in a separate quarter; but the offspring of the inferior, or of the better when they chance to be deformed, will be put away in some mysterious, unknown place, as they should be.
Any one above or below the prescribed ages who takes part in the public hymeneals shall be said to have done an unholy and unrighteous thing; the child of which he is the father, if it steals into life, will have been conceived under auspices very unlike the sacrifices and prayers, which at each hymeneal priestesses and priest and the whole city will offer, that the new generation may be better and more useful than their good and useful parents, whereas his child will be the offspring of darkness and strange lust.
And we grant all this, accompanying the permission with strict orders to prevent any embryo which may come into being from seeing the light; and if any force a way to the birth, the parents must understand that the offspring of such an union cannot be maintained, and arrange accordingly.
They were not wanted, as their offspring might inherit and transmit the tendency to prolonged incubation, and thus upset the system which has maintained for ages and which permits the adult Martians to figure the proper time for return to the incubators, almost to an hour.
His father had married without the pale of the church to which he belonged, and had, in this manner, forfeited some of the privileges of his offspring.
A Cambridge University study found that females in some cooperatively breeding species reduce the size of their eggs when other members of their group are available to help protect, incubate and feed offspring after laying.
USA], Nov 9 (ANI): Mothers-to-be, you may want to avoid using plastic-packaged products as according a recent study a chemical used in them may cause health problems for your offspring.
The in utero environment, including maternal nutrition, stress, and exposure to chemicals, can influence susceptibility of offspring to chronic diseases at adulthood (Rosenfeld 2012).
Compared with the offspring of Framingham participants who were normotensive, those with one parent who developed hypertension before age 55 years were at twofold increased risk of subsequent hypertension.
Interestingly, time of quitting before conception was not independently associated with offspring asthma,' said Cecilie Svanes, Professor at the University of Bergen, Norway.