omission

(redirected from omissions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

omission

n. 1) failure to perform an act agreed to, where there is a duty to an individual or the public to act (including omitting to take care) or is required by law. Such an omission may give rise to a lawsuit in the same way as a negligent or improper act. 2) inadvertently leaving out a word, phrase or other language from a contract, deed, judgment or other document. If the parties agree that the omission was due to a mutual mistake, the document may be "reformed," but this may require a petition for a court order making the correction if it had been relied upon by government authorities or third parties. (See: negligence, breach of contract, reformation)

omission

noun breach, carelessness, default, default in performance, delinquency, dereliction, disregard, exclusion, failure, failure to perform, inadvertence, laxity, laxness, leaving out, neglect, neglect to perform, negligence, nonfeasance, noninclusion, oversight, passing over, praetermissio, pretermission, remissness, slip
Associated concepts: material omission, negligent omission, omission of duty, omission to act, willful omission
Foreign phrases: Omissio eorum quae tacite insunt nihil operatur.The omission of those things which are tacitly expressed is unimportant.
See also: breach, default, deficiency, deficit, delinquency, dereliction, desuetude, dishonor, dispensation, exception, exclusion, failure, fault, flaw, infraction, laches, miscue, mistake, neglect, negligence, nonfeasance, nonpayment, nonperformance, offense, ostracism, rejection, removal, renunciation

OMISSION. An omission is the neglect to perform what the law requires.
     2. When a public law enjoins on certain officers duties to be performed by them for the public, and they omit to perform them, they may be indicted: for example, supervisors of the highways are required to repair the public roads; the neglect to do so will render them liable to be indicted.
     3. When a nuisance arises in consequence of an omission, it cannot be abated if it be a private nuisance without giving notice, when such notice can be given. Vide Branches; Commission; Nuisance; Trees.

References in periodicals archive ?
Question Four Was there any error or omission by commanding officers which caused or contributed to the crush on the terrace?
As such, that candidate must already be subjected to unlawful acts or omissions as may be promulgated by law or regulation," Escudero said.
Under the Escudero bill, "The unlawful acts or omissions during elections, as promulgated by law or the Commission on Elections, shall be applicable to all candidates upon filing of the certificate of candidacy.
6, Knowledge of Error: Return Preparation and Administrative Proceedings, impose standards of conduct on CPAs who discover an error or omission in a prior-year tax return.
Ultimately, Barnwell's solution to negligent omissions turns upon (a) Scotus's reworking of Anselm's account of the will as constituted by two affectiones--namely, the affectio commodi and affectio iustitiae--and (b) Suarez's notion of "virtual knowledge.
Nurse rounding programs have also been suggested as ways to prevent care omissions.
Errors and omissions coverage is a professional liability policy covering the policyholder for negligent acts and/or omissions that may harm his or her clients.
An important part of risk management involves purchasing Real Estate Errors and Omissions insurance from a financially strong insurance company to protect you and your business.
Tales of the Tur f - Captain X (1940) It was also beyond comprehension that John FairfaxBlakeborough received no mention - a serious omission of one of the great Turf historians.
Resulting from acts or omissions expected or intended to cause bodily injury or physical damage;
The Canadian Catechism showed many of the same omissions.
In examining the evidence, Taunton notices "ambiguities, contradictions and omissions in policy and prescription" (222).