Breath

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BREATH, med. juris. The air expelled from the chest at each expiration.
     2. Breathing, though a usual sign of life, is not conclusive that a child was wholly born alive, as breathing may take place before the whole delivery of the mother is complete. 5 Carr. & Payn, 329; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 344. Vide Birth; Life; Infanticide.

References in classic literature ?
It would be false to say that one could ever be alone when one has one's lovely thoughts to comfort one.
But what is to be done if I have taken it into my head that that is not the only object in life, and that if one must live one had better live in a mansion?
If one would have a friend, then must one also be willing to wage war for him: and in order to wage war, one must be CAPABLE of being an enemy.
(ii) Pairs of opposites which are contraries are not in any way interdependent, but are contrary the one to the other.
Some of the less important dailies give one a tablespoonful of a continued story every day; it is strung across the bottom of the page, in the French fashion.
This talk went in at one ear and out at the other, for a boy who spends his life eating and sleeping does not worry about anything till it actually stares him in the face.
"One can trust you, certainly, to say unpleasant things," he said, smoothing out the page, clearing his throat, and reading half a stanza to himself.
In Varenka she realized that one has but to forget oneself and love others, and one will be calm, happy, and noble.
But ought we to attempt to construct one? I said; for to do so, as I am inclined to think, will be a very serious task.
In the county in which Tuskegee is situated the coloured people outnumbered the whites by about three to one. In some of the adjoining and near-by counties the proportion was not far from six coloured persons to one white.
This gives us, so far, only those particulars which constitute one thing at one time.
As Bell had worked out his invention in Salem, one editor displayed the headline, "Salem Witchcraft." The New York Herald said: "The effect is weird and almost supernatural." The Providence Press said: "It is hard to resist the notion that the powers of darkness are somehow in league with it." And The Boston Times said, in an editorial of bantering ridicule: "A fellow can now court his girl in China as well as in East Boston; but the most serious aspect of this invention is the awful and irresponsible power it will give to the average mother-in- law, who will be able to send her voice around the habitable globe."