onomastic

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Related to onomastics: Onomastician

onomastic

denoting a signature in a different handwriting from that of the document to which it is attached.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jeff Grant has found a record-breaking name that ends in an onomastic trick.
This dissertation, which received the university's Distinguished Dissertation Award, made a groundbreaking contribution to onomastics.
Where it regards the second stated goal of GuPauskyte's study--to "contribute to the growing field of literature that articulates voices of resistance" (20)--the author's argument could be strengthened by a second look at the extensive indigenous onomastic system that informed Columbus.
Another domain in which Tolkien tied the landscape to philology and thought that people often got it wrong was onomastics.
Wamitila, 1999) The primary utilization of literary onomastics is as a process of critical grasp backing literary incentives.
Calinescu or Morometii and Intrusul ("The Outsider") by Marin Preda, an entire onomastic treasure awaits recapitalization also in the cultural anthropology area as an asset that must be protected.
Chapter 8 examines onomastics, how names become common words, while Chapter 9 examines word play and riddles.
Keywords: Illyrians, Roman Dacia, Romanization, acculturation, religion, onomastics, necropolises.
For example, the chapter on Romeo and Juliet uses an analysis of the play's language and of the relationship between language and identity as demonstrated in Brian Friel's Translations and the Canadian 1989 production, Romeo and Juliette, in order to argue that this play can be read as offering two alternative views of the relationship between onomastics and ontology and as potentially engaging in bilingualism.
Not only pre-Ottoman Anatolian history, but also early Ottoman relies on architecture, inscriptions and onomastics as well as on testimonies written at the time in Byzantine or Attic Greek, Italian, French and German, as well as on Ottoman chroniclers.
To trace this transformation Laforgue engages in some witty onomastics to show Balzac at once denying and affirming his early pseudonymous work as part of his constructing ah image of himself.
Myths abound in the study of Jewish names, or Jewish onomastics, one of the rare fields where firm conclusions are often drawn from the dim memories of a few utterances of a great-aunt.