onomastic

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onomastic

denoting a signature in a different handwriting from that of the document to which it is attached.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) Consequently these two names contradict each other from an onomastic point of view, although the same individual is certainly meant by them.
Here the study of prosopography may offer some assistance to the study of onomastics. For example, Rivkah Harris finds that half-a-dozen naditu women of Samas in Sippar bore the Akkadian name Amat-Samas 'slave of Samas.' (86) It is not hard to suppose that their names reflected their calling in life, but it is not, as far as I know, clear whether they were born to their status as naditus or changed their name when they took on the status.
181-82) - but earlier than I can accept, since it requires a freer use of onomastic evidence than Rutgers' own warnings in chapter four would allow and it assumes chronological relationships that cannot be proved.
The book under review is the last (so far) in a series of limited Semitic onomastic presentations intended to spread the ideas of W.
One has only to look at social-historical work, like that on conversion by Richard Bulliet, to realize the complexity of the Islamic onomastic system.
In Estonian onomastics, annexes are not classed under transferred names.
Another fact is that the foremost, if not nearly all, attestations of these "vulgar characters," including the three "stacked-up" ones cited in Wei shu, are found among contemporary onomastics, which underwent a sea change during that period.
Mainly a textual study, the author offers a focused and deep look valuable to interests ranging from the history of geography and cultural reproduction to literary onomastics. Much of the coverage focuses on close readings of well-known prose and poetic texts; from homilies, saints' lives, Bede and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles to Beowulf, Genesis, Andreas, and a variety of shorter pieces.
In case you are wondering, this fact and others make up part of an entire field called onomastics. Onomasticians, who are trained in various scholarly subdisciplines, study proper names, and many of their results are fascinating.
They cover phonology and its written reflexes; particles and their functional uses; tense, aspect, modality, and evidentiality; speech acts and pragmatics; syntax, thematic roles, and their morpho-lexical interface; lexicon and onomastics; and Greek and other languages.
And after I've spent almost a decade inundated with often sterile and uninspirational place name theory and how it may fit within more general research in onomastics, the study of proper names, Evans's tongue-in-cheek take is more than welcome.