opening

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opening

(Initial presentation of a case), noun beginning of a case, commencement of a case, counsel's initial statement, counsel's introductory statement, counsel's overview of a case, inception of litigation, initiation of a legal case, introduction of a case, introductory, start of a case
Associated concepts: litigation, opening statement

opening

(Opportunity), noun availability, chance, means, moment, occasion, once-in-a-lifetime chance, place, possibility, presented with an opportunity
See also: access, admission, admittance, chance, egress, entrance, entry, first appearance, fortuity, hiatus, inception, initial, loophole, margin, occasion, onset, opportunity, original, origination, outlet, outset, portal, preamble, preface, preliminary, prelude, preparatory, rift, start

TO OPEN, OPENING. To open a case is to make a statement of the pleadings in a case, which is called the opening.
     2. The opening should be concise, very distinct and perspicuous. Its use is to enable the judge and jury to direct their attention to the real merits of the case, and the points in issue. 1 Stark. R. 439;S. C. 2 E. C. L. R. 462; 2 Stark. R. 31; S. C 3 Eng. C. L. R. 230.
     3. The opening address or speech is that made immediately after the evidence has been closed; such address usually states, 1st. The full extent of the plaintiff's claims, and the circumstances under which they are made, to show that they are just and reasonable. 2d. At least an outline of the evidence by which those claims are to be established. 3d. The legal grounds and authorities in favor of the claim or of the proposed evidence. 4th. An anticipation of the expected defence, and statement of the grounds on which it is futile, "either in law or justice, and the reasons why it ought to fail. 3 Chit. Pr. 881; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3044, et seq. To open a judgment, is to set it aside.

References in classic literature ?
Here is shelter for one at least, John Carter," he said, and, glancing down, I saw an opening in the base of the tree about three feet in diameter.
A backward glance convinced me that to return by the way I had come would be more hazardous than to continue across the plateau, so, putting spurs to my poor beast, I made a dash for the opening to the pass which I could distinguish on the far side of the table land.
He discovered himself to be in a bare room which was windowless, nor could he see any other opening than that through which he had been lowered.
With this he began walking in the air toward the high openings, and Dorothy and Zeb followed him.
An opening left in the disc allowed them to light the match with which each was provided.
The smoke wreathed above their heads in little eddies, and curling in a spiral form it ascended swiftly through the opening in the roof of the lodge, leaving the place beneath clear of its fumes, and each dark visage distinctly visible.
There were branches, too, and other tunnels which crossed this, and occasionally openings not more than a foot in diameter; these latter being usually close to the floor.
I almost came up with the man in the ante-room, for he had lost time in opening the door to the gallery.
The second grotto was lower and more gloomy than the first; the air that could only enter by the newly formed opening had the mephitic smell Dantes was surprised not to find in the outer cavern.
Suddenly, Raoul remembered something about a gate opening into the Rue Scribe, an underground passage running straight to the Rue Scribe from the lake.
There was a noise as of the opening and closing of the hall door; he heard quick, heavy footsteps along the passage--heard them ascend the stairs--heard them on the uncarpeted floor of the chamber immediately overhead.
I refer to the address which I delivered at the opening of the Atlanta Cotton states and International Exposition, at Atlanta, Ga.