opposing party


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opposing party

noun adversary, appellant, appellee, challenger, claimant, complainant, contender, defendant, disputant, petitioner, plaintiff, respondent, the other party, the other side
Associated concepts: adversarial system, litigation
See also: adversary, complainant, contestant, foe, litigant, opponent, party
References in periodicals archive ?
A bright-line rule imposing sanctions only in cases of willful destruction that results in prejudice to the opposing party
Depositions are used to flesh out a topic so the opposing party in the litigation can send more specific and tailored discovery requests, such as interrogatories and document requests.
295) Subsection (d) states that a lawyer shall not, "in pretrial procedure, make a frivolous discovery request or fail to make reasonably diligent effort to comply with a legally proper discovery request by an opposing party.
45) Instead, Rule 56 required that the opposing party be given notice of the filing of the motion and, by implication, any supporting affidavits, at least ten days in advance of the hearing.
is the most controversial in that it would require notice be given to the opposing party .
Until there is a better-developed body of case law in this area, insurance companies should follow the guidance provided elsewhere in the amendments to the Federal Rules--confer with the opposing party.
Synopsis: Despite President Bush's efforts to inspire some anti-Democratic passion among the GOP masses, it is those favoring Democratic control of Congress who show more concern about the possibility of the opposing party winning control coming out of Tuesday's elections.
Our federal government may work better (well, less badly) when at least one house of Congress is controlled by the opposing party.
The opposing party in a lawsuit will likely use this email to try and prove that the company infringes the opposing party's patents, even if the statement is completely incorrect.
Of course, this means that a lawyer must not lie to or mislead another lawyer or opposing party.
They are pretty much already hard-core liberals and hard-core conservatives, so gerrymandering allows them to vote their core convictions and not be worried about serious challenges from the opposing party,'' said Los Angeles political analyst Allan Hoffenblum.