Oppression

(redirected from oppressions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Oppression

The offense, committed by a public official, of wrongfully inflicting injury, such as bodily harm or imprisonment, upon another individual under color of office.

Oppression, which is a misdemeanor, is committed through any act of cruelty, severity, unlawful exaction, or excessive use of authority.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oppression is commonly associated with injustice and the abuse of power.
A result of this limited approach, if it actually worked, could be that we'd end one or more oppressions without improving the conditions that keep oppression going as a strategy.
(31) Thus for Collins, those positioned on the downside of power relations are more likely to become aware of and resist oppression. Furthermore, if Collins is correct, then it is likely that people who become critical educators will become aware of the oppressions that most directly affect them more readily than they become aware of oppressive relations that less directly affect them.
Clients structurally disadvantaged by race/ethnicity, social class, gender, or sexual orientation are especially vulnerable to oppression and require social workers to act as advocates on their behalf.
Political sociology; oppression, resistance, and the state.
According to Reynolds and Pope (1991), persons experience multiple oppressions when they are members of two or more oppressed groups.
It becomes evident, for example, that Jones's understanding of his socioeconomic oppression is linked to his frustration at not being able fully to sexually dominate black and white women.
In this groundbreaking tex t, Cone defined the compatibility of the Seemingly incongruous concepts of Black Power and Christianity, drawing from histories by oppressed people in the United States, and divorcing the concept of Christian love from any form of submission to oppression. Something new happened in the United States' theological world, as certainly as Detroit's political power base shifted after the '67 Rebellion.
While silence, in some instances, is transformed into a liberatory voice and, in others, masks a history of colonization, silence also takes the form of stubborn resistan ce to exploitation and oppression. Chapter Three, "Spirit, Materiality and the Road to Freedom: Third World Feminism in Praisesong for the Widow," explores the notion of spirituality as manifested through corporeality.
Johnson, her employer insists on referring to her by her first name only, while Madam must refer to her employer as "Madam." The fact that Madam is overworked and exploited by her employer, yet her employer claims to "love" her, points to the historic relationship between white and Black women of racist and sexist oppression. Though both Madam and her employer share a subordinate, female status, the oppressions heaped upon Madam are in no way lessened by the fact that her oppressor is a woman.
Most compellingly, the juxtaposition of the phrase ladies first with the scenes from South Africa points to the hypocrisy of arguments for separate spheres for men and ladies, or whites and blacks--a parallel which shows how the same rationales are used to justify the oppression of blacks and women, and identifies the similarity between sexism and racism and the importance of resisting both oppressions.
Butler's response reveals the usefulness of the term slavery both as historical experience and as a metaphor for other oppressions, while she apparently struggles with the uses critics make of her fiction as it addresses this issue.