oral

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oral

adjective announced, articulated, audible, by word of mouth, communicated, enunciated, expressed, expressed in words, phonic, said, said aloud, sounded, spoken, spoken out loud, told, unwritten, uttered, verbal, vocal, vocalized, voiced
Associated concepts: nuncupative will, oral contract, oral testimony, statute of frauds
See also: language, nuncupative, parol, verbal

ORAL. Something spoken in contradistinction to something written; as oral evidence, which is evidence delivered verbally by a witness,

References in periodicals archive ?
Oral Biology, Leeds Dental Institute, Claredon Way, Leeds, England, LS2 9LU
David Wong, associate dean of research and professor of oral biology, and oral biology and medicine at the school.
She earned her bachelor's degree in dental hygiene from UW in 1976, and acquired a master's degree in oral biology from UW in 2011.
of Oral Biology and Dermatology, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY, for the presentation "The human periorbital wrinkle: immunohistory and computer modeling suggest key roles for directional collagen fibers, and mechanical force in wrinkle maintenance.
During infection, there is a balancing act of the immune system," notes Ning Quan, assistant professor of oral biology.
That's not to say these natural materials may not prove to be good at some point, but we can't say right now whether they are or they aren't,'' said Wolinsky, a professor of oral biology and medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Dentistry.
Greenspan, chairman of oral biology at the University of California in San Francisco.
Finding these bacteria and using them to create ProBiora3 is the first of several innovative technologies discovered from oral biology, which Oragenics plans to bring to the marketplace.
This innovative and patented technology was developed in the Department of Oral Biology and Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine.
Lead author of the study Daniel Kadouri, PhD, an assistant professor of oral biology the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Dental School, said their findings leave them confident that, in isolation, pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to successful attack by predator bacteria, predator bacteria do not appear inherently harmful to ocular cells when applied topically, and a live organism can tolerate the predator bacteria well.
Norton teaches oral biology at Creighton University.