ordinary wear and tear

ordinary wear and tear

noun diminution, normal damage, normal decline in value, normal deeerioration, normal detriment, normal harm, normal impairrent, normal loss
Associated concepts: depreciation, residual value insurance
References in periodicals archive ?
It may be noted that a tenant is obligated to surrender the possession of the rented apartment to the landlord in the same condition in which he received it at the time of entering into the rental contract, except for the ordinary wear and tear. This is in accordance with Article 21 of the Dubai Tenancy Law which states: "Upon the expiry of the term of the lease contract, the tenant must surrender possession of the real property to the landlord in the same condition in which the he received it at the time of entering into the lease agreement, except for ordinary wear and tear or for damage due to reasons beyond the tenant's control.
In case law applying the Takings Clause to a temporary taking of a building-with fixtures and equipment, the Court has ruled that the government is liable for any damage to the property, including damage to any permanent fixtures and equipment, excluding ordinary wear and tear. At the conclusion of a temporary taking where the building has incurred damage in excess of ordinary wear and tear, the government may elect either to arrange and pay for the repairs itself or to leave this task to the owner, in which case the government is obligated to pay for the reasonable cost of such restoration plus the reasonable rental value of the premises for the period reasonably necessary to restore the property.
In addition, the government was ordered to pay compensation for damage to the plant and machinery beyond ordinary wear and tear incurred during the government's use of the facility.
[7] Continuing its tendency to look to customary practices in the rental market for inspiration to determine just compensation for temporary takings, the Court reasoned that such an award was constitutionally justified because responsibility for damages in excess of ordinary wear and tear are typically borne by the tenant in the landlord-tenant context.
"I think that courts would agree that any kind of stains, marks, or nicks that have to be filled in are beyond ordinary wear and tear," says James H.
For example you might say that fingerprints on light switches could be considered beyond ordinary wear and tear because if it were your home, you would clean that as part of routine maintenance.
When you retain all or part of an ex-resident's security deposit, "you must explain why you considered the damage worse than ordinary wear and tear and how you spent the money you deducted," says Bownas.
Accordingly, a landlord's covenant to restore leased property if it should become untenantable applies to damage from these causes and not to the effect of ordinary wear and tear or to the results of neglect or fault of the tenant."
This is in accordance with Article 21 of the Dubai Rental Law, which states, "Upon the expiry of the term of the lease contract, the tenant must surrender possession of the real property to the landlord in the same condition in which he received it at the time of entering into the agreement except for ordinary wear and tear or for damage due to reasons beyond the tenant's control.
After the lease contract expires, the tenant must surrender possession of the real property to the landlord in the same condition in which he received it at the time of entering into the agreement, except for ordinary wear and tear or for damage due to reasons beyond the tenant's control
This is in accordance with Article 21 of the Dubai Rental Law, which states, "Upon the expiry of the term of the lease contract, the tenant must surrender possession of the real property to the landlord in the same condition in which it was received at the time of entering into the agreement, except for ordinary wear and tear or damage due to reasons beyond tenant's control.
26 of 2006 regulating the Relationship between Landlords and Tenants in the Emirate of Dubai, which states: "Upon the expiry of the term of the Lease Contract, the tenant must surrender possession of the real property to the landlord in the same condition in which the tenant received it at the time of entering into the lease contract except for ordinary wear and tear or for damage due to reasons beyond the tenant's control.