orphan

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orphan

n. a child, particularly a minor, whose two natural parents are dead. In some cases, such as whether a child is eligible for public financial assistance to an orphan, "orphan" can mean a child who has lost one parent.

orphan

noun abandoned child, abandoned infant, bereaved child, castaway, child without parents, foundling, homeless child, orbus, orphaned child, orphaned infant, parentless child, twice-bereaved child, waif, ward

ORPHAN. A minor or infant who has lost both of his or her parents. Sometimes the term is applied to such a person who has lost only one of his or her parents. 3 Mer. 48; 2 Sim. & Stu. 93; Lo & Man. Inst. B. 1, t. 2, c. 1. See Hazzard's Register of Pennsylvania, vol. 14, pages 188, 1 89, for a correspondence between the Hon. Joseph Hopkinson and ex-president J. Q. Adams as to the meaning of the word Orphan, and Rob. 247.

References in periodicals archive ?
Though Brauner focuses particularly on issues of ethnicity, it seems that not only Mary-Emma's race but also her poverty, youth, orphanhood, and gender conspire to prevent her from being able to carve out an identity for herself or to determine her own "narrative path.
In the 10 countries for which data on orphanhood were available, 7% of respondents were maternal orphans; the proportion was lowest in Liberia (4%) and highest in Zimbabwe (17%).
Escape is not the way," Laci proclaims as he realizes that to stay "sane" and balanced he must stop his ceaseless travels from one country to another, from one continent to another, and make a concerted effort to suspend, at least temporarily, his state of "permanent transience"--a phrase Andre Aciman uses to describe the exilic predicament--and start listening carefully to his mother's life story of dispossession, dislocation, abandonment and orphanhood before she succumbs to uterine cancer.
1] Psychosocial stressors, such as poverty, orphanhood and parental illness (physical and mental), experienced by HIV-positive children living in disadvantaged communities place them at further risk of poor educational and mental health outcomes.
Indirect costs include long-term economic consequences of orphanhood, such as juvenile and adult criminal activity, mental illness, substance abuse, domestic violence, loss of productivity due to unemployment or underemployment, special education services, and health care system (5).
Deon Movies, Inequalities in Education: Effects of Gender, Poverty, Orphanhood, and Disability (ch.
Urgent concerns about the socioeconomic needs of orphaned children in Africa in the last decade have overshadowed the psychological impact of orphanhood (Atwine, Cantor-Graae, & Bajunirwe, 2005), leaving orphanages financially unable to provide resources to meet the attachment, social integration, and acculturation needs of the children in their care (Wakhweya et al.
Yet to her lasting credit, those interests never overshadow her own natural acumen for producing ambitious and highly independent close readings of salient issues (such as the poet's portrayal of national identity and alienation, deviation from societal norms, madness, orphanhood, otherness, and repression), in her own terms.
Both of them allow or encourage Primrose to explore her nascent interest in food, which ultimately develops into a means for her to cope with her temporary orphanhood.
He earned his doctorate from ucla's Department of Comparative Literature with a dissertation on the question of orphanhood in the British novel.
Emotional rejection, permanent breaking or limitation of bonds between a child and their parent cause the appearance of features typical of deprivation syndrome, mental atrophy, family lessness, anaclitic depression, separation anxiety, self-alienation, or orphanhood.