ostensible authority


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ostensible authority

n. apparent authority to do something or represent another person or entity. (See: apparent authority, ostensible agent)

ostensible authority

authority that appears from the circumstances to exist whatever the reality may be. The manager of a shop has ostensible authority in relation to many transactions, regardless of what authority the owner may actually have given him. See AGENCY, APPARENT AUTHORITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ostensible authority exists where the insurer intentionally (or carelessly) causes a third person to believe someone who is "not really employed" by the insurer is its agent.
Mr Gaydamak submitted in the alternative that General Kopelipa had apparent or ostensible authority because Mr Leviev represented by his words and conduct that General Kopelipa had actual authority and Mr Gaydamak has relied on that representation.
Although agency can also arise by virtue of statute and by the principal's later ratification of the unauthorized agent's earlier deeds, perhaps the most fascinating problems arise under what is sometimes called "agency by estoppel," referring to situations in which an "agent" acts with the apparent or ostensible authority of the principal.
The court made it clear that could be construed to mean that the hospitalists, although not employed the hospital, were its agents under a theory of ostensible authority, such the hospital could be held vicariously liable for their conduct, the court concluded the lower court did not err.
Agency is currently dealt with in the GPCL, and the Contract Law, and the Supreme People's Court has found it necessary to issue a number of Interpretations to deal with issues related to apparent or ostensible authority and estoppel.
As the evening's presenter and an ostensible authority figure in the space, Frank rehearses a position overdetermined by prior Sherry performances, and thus the action consummates rather than interrupts the work (or, to be accurate, the former is the consequence of the latter).
Buxton said that the deal was signed by Sanderson ``with the council's ostensible authority,'' and added: ``Those who dealt with Doncaster racecourse dealt with Mr Sanderson.
The firm was held vicariously liable on the basis of ostensible authority, even though the fraud had not been committed for the firm's benefit.
Mintz dissecting the prime-time habit of placing impossibly groomed fashion plates in positions of ostensible authority, and offers persuasive evidence that televised female power is usually undercut by a "feminine" core of sex appeal and insecurity.
In fact, there are many scenarios in which a hospital may be held liable for the acts of one who is not its employee, the most obvious of which are cases in which a hospital has allowed one who is not its employee to act with ostensible authority as a representative of the hospital.