Overhead

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Overhead

A sum total of the administrative or executive costs that relate to the management, conduct, or supervision of a business that are not attributable to any one particular product or department.

Expenses such as rent, taxes, insurance, lighting, heating, and other miscellaneous office expenses all fall under the category of overhead.

References in periodicals archive ?
The component of project overhead costs vary significantly ranging between 11 and 20 percent or more of the total direct costs, depending on the project size, type, location, the consultants involved and the client [2].
Accurate estimation requires a contractor to cover all direct and indirect or overhead costs, which constitute the two major types of expenses in construction.
P1 students should be aware that fundamentals in management accounting, such as accounting for overheads, don't end with C01.
The project team has also obtained the following information about the support activities: Activity Cost driver Overheads ($) Theatre preparation for each session No of preparations 864,000 Operating theatre usage Procedure time 1,449,000 Nursing and ancillary services Inpatient days 5,428,000 Administration Sales revenue 1,216,000 Other overheads No of procedures 923,000 9,880,000
Based on the use of that phrase, the unallocated overhead expense would be recorded with selling and administrative expenses.
If a company used practical capacity as normal capacity, any time it produced at levels lower than full production, it would have to recognize its unallocated overhead expenses as current-period costs.
While overhead projectors can cost as little as $100, the cheapest document camera intended for classroom use is close to $1,400.
Given that even a low-end document camera costs 10 times more than an overhead projector, it's not surprising that ELMO sold more than 30,000 overhead projectors last year and only about 17,000 document cameras.
These items, combined with the traditional overhead projector, are used for presentations of quality data to the medical staff and the board of directors.
As can be seen from the diagram, with this system the budget allowance for overheads is determined by reference to the actual man-hours worked, at point B.
Should there be an overhead for each transaction or should the parent institution provide these through a central budget?
Understanding overhead, or information work, requires a step-by-step approach.