overpraise


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Teachers often overpraise students for everyday tasks and behaviors that do not merit a verbal reward.
Sometimes if you're not sure of something, you have to hit a deadline, it's possible you'll overpraise it," he says.
John Stuart Mill's mother having been a mere "drudge," Mill's overpraise of his later wife "reads like the mournful [sic] tribute of a man in search of a woman he could unconditionally adore as he could never adore his real mother" (p.
Given the richness and complexity of the period which Pyman has described and analysed with acute intelligence and insight, it is difficult to overpraise her achievement.
I do think of the children and know that to overpraise a book does them a disservice.
Gass once wrote in commenting on an especially well-turned Barthelmean period, "it is impossible to overpraise such a sentence.
It's difficult to overpraise these books, first published in the 1960s and now reprinted in paperback, that together give you as thorough and vital a portrait of the Colorado Plateau--its geology, and natural and human history--as can be found anywhere.
Barcelona coach Gerardo Martino, also making his clasico debut, was careful not to overpraise Neymar, while also giving credit to Messi for his work in defense.
I find that seminal, a word used chiefly by academics to overpraise one another, tends vastly to underrate the power of semen.