owner


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Owner

The person recognized by the law as having the ultimate control over, and right to use, property as long as the law permits and no agreement or Covenant limits his or her rights.

owner

n. one who has legal title or right to something. Contrary to the cynical adage: "Possession is nine-tenths of the law," possession does not necessarily make one a legal owner. (See: own)

owner

noun claimer, controller, holder, homeowner, householder, land owner, landlord, lessor, legitimate perron entitled to, master, occupier, person holding ownerrhip on record, possessor, property owner, proprietor, record-holder, retainer, title holder
Associated concepts: beneficial owner, co-owner, equiiable owner, general owner, gun owner, joint owners, owner of copyright, part owners, record owner, repeated owner
See also: director, employer, holder, lessor, principal, proprietor, shareholder, tenant

OWNER, property. The owner is he who has dominion of a thing real or personal, corporeal or incorporeal, which he has a right to enjoy and to do with as he pleases, even to spoil or destroy it, as far as the law permits, unless he be prevented by some agreement or covenant which restrains his right.
     2. The right of the owner is more extended than that of him who has only the use of the thing. The owner of an estate may, therefore change the face of it; he may cut the wood, demolish the buildings, build new ones, and dig wherever he may deem proper, for minerals, stone, plaster, and similar things. He may commit what would be considered waste if done by another.
     3. The owner continues to have the same right although he perform no acts of ownership, or be disabled from performing them, and although another perform such acts, without the knowledge or against the will of the owner. But the owner may lose his right in a thing, if he permit it to remain in the possession of a third person, for sufficient time to enable the latter to acquire a title to it by prescription, or lapse of time. See Civil Code of Louis. B. 2, t. 2, c. 1; Encyclopedie de M. D'Alembert, Proprietaire.
     4. When there are several joint owners of a thing, as for example, of a ship, the majority of them have the right to make contracts in respect of such thing, in the usual course of business or repair, and the like, and the minority will be bound by such contracts. Holt, 586; 1 Bell's Com. 519, 5th ed. See 5 Whart. R. 366.

References in classic literature ?
"Well, my dear Dantes, are you now free?" inquired the owner.
"Well, well, my dear Edmond," continued the owner, "don't let me detain you.
It will take quite six weeks to unload the cargo, and we cannot get you ready for sea until three months after that; only be back again in three months, for the Pharaon," added the owner, patting the young sailor on the back, "cannot sail without her captain."
"If I were sole owner we'd shake hands on it now, my dear Dantes, and call it settled; but I have a partner, and you know the Italian proverb -- Chi ha compagno ha padrone --
Morrel," exclaimed the young seaman, with tears in his eyes, and grasping the owner's hand, "M.
The shipowner, smiling, followed him with his eyes until he saw him spring out on the quay and disappear in the midst of the throng, which from five o'clock in the morning until nine o'clock at night, swarms in the famous street of La Canebiere, -- a street of which the modern Phocaeans are so proud that they say with all the gravity in the world, and with that accent which gives so much character to what is said, "If Paris had La Canebiere, Paris would be a second Marseilles." On turning round the owner saw Danglars behind him, apparently awaiting orders, but in reality also watching the young sailor, -- but there was a great difference in the expression of the two men who thus followed the movements of Edmond Dantes.
That he knew his business his owners were convinced, or at forty he would not have held command of the Tryapsic, three thousand tons net register, with a cargo capacity of nine thousand tons and valued at fifty-thousand pounds.
"Twice afore I mentioned thot door tull the owners," said Captain MacElrath.
"When I was a young men I used tull be afeard thot the owners would guv me the sack.
An' then the owners can guv me the sack uz soon uz they like.
An' ut was ot Comox, takun' un bunker coal, I got the letter from the owners. The boss humself hod signed ut, an' ot the bottom he wrut un hus own bond: 'The Arrata beat you by four an' a half days.
Ot Hong-Kong I got a letter from the owners. The bill hod been sent tull them.