PACE

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PACE

abbreviation for POLICE AND CRIMINAL EVIDENCE Act.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

PACE. A measure of length containing two feet and a half; the geometrical pace is five feet long. The common pace is the length of a step; the geometrical is the length of two steps, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The retrospective study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised data of patients aged up to 16 years who underwent epicardial dual chamber permanent pacemaker insertion via xiphisternal incision between April 2011 and August 2016.
The global market for implantable pacemaker products is anticipated to see moderate, single-digit growth throughout the forecast period covered by this analysis (2017-23).
As per the American Heart Association, a pacemaker is a small battery-operated device which helps the heart beat in a regular rhythm.
Each of the five cardiac patients had an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, that met standard criteria for pacemaker implantation and have since recovered and are doing well, according to the medical center.
Around 10 per cent of people over the age of 70 have a pacemaker implanted, and approximately one million pacemakers are implanted annually, providing electrical stimulation to regulate a patient's heartbeat.
Approximately a million pacemakers are annually implanted in patients to provide electrical stimulation to regulate heartbeat.
Most lead fractures occur in the pacemaker pocket or between clavicle and the first rib mainly due to compression of a lead lateral to the entry site between soft tissues muscles and ligaments.
He had a history of dual chamber pacemaker insertion 12 years ago for complete heart block in an outside hospital.
Now, a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to the Los Angeles-based Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute is helping investigators move closer to their goal of developing a biological pacemaker that can treat patients afflicted with slow heartbeats.
The patient had a history of VVI pacemaker implantation for complete atrioventricular (AV) block following 3-vessel bypass surgery for coronary artery disease before 10 years.