pack

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See: assemblage, band, cargo, impact, load, overload, quantity

TO PACK. To deceive by false appearance; to counterfeit; to delude; as packing a jury. (q.v.) Bac. Ab. Juries, M; 12 Conn. R. 262.

References in classic literature ?
If an earth were overlooked, it meant some dispute as to the ownership of the land, and then and there the Hunt checked and settled it in this wise: The Governor and the Inspector side by side, but the latter half a horse's length to the rear; both bare-shouldered claimants well in front; the villagers half-mooned behind them, and Farag with the pack, who quite understood the performance, sitting down on the left.
Then Robin turned to Little John, and quoth he, "Go thou and Will Stutely and bring forth those five pack horses yonder.
He hitched his pack farther over on his left shoulder, so as to take a portion of its weight from off the injured ankle.
Once, during the morning, while Anson took a breathing spell after bringing in another hundred-pound pack, Tarwater delicately hinted his impression.
they're made o' purpose for folks as want to send out a little carguy; light, an' take up no room,--you may pack twenty pound so as you can't see the passill; an' they're manifacturs as please fools, so I reckon they aren't like to want a market.
It belongs to my mistress, and I have my mistress's orders to pack up everything in the room.
They take orders from the Head of the Pack, and not from any striped cattle-killer.
When ye fight with a Wolf of the Pack, ye must fight him alone and afar, Lest others take part in the quarrel, and the Pack be diminished by war.
And, in the morning, I pack it before I have used it, and have to unpack again to get it, and it is always the last thing I turn out of the bag; and then I repack and forget it, and have to rush upstairs for it at the last moment and carry it to the railway station, wrapped up in my pocket- handkerchief.
Here they experienced considerable difficulty in making an entrance against the combined current and ebb tide, but by taking advantage of eddies close in to shore they came about dusk to a point nearly opposite the spot where they had left the pack asleep.
They raised the hunting-cry of the pack, surged against their collars, and swerved aside in pursuit.
In truth, it was the LOST PACK, the pack of the primeval world before the dog ever came in to the fires of men, and, for that matter, before men built fires and before men were men.