pain and suffering

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pain and suffering

n. the physical and mental distress suffered from an injury, including actual broken bones and internal ruptures, but also the aches, pain, temporary and permanent limitations on activity, potential shortening of life, depression, and embarrassment from scarring, all of which are part of the "general damages" recoverable by someone injured by another's negligence or intentional attack. The dollar value of damages for pain and suffering is subjective, as distinguished from medical bills, future medicals, and lost wages which can be calculated, called "special damages." (See: damages, general damages, special damages, suffering)

References in classic literature ?
The capacity for pain is not needed in the muscle, and it is not placed there,--is but little needed in the skin, and only here and there over the thigh is a spot capable of feeling pain.
But the poor doctor did look troubled, and had cause to do so, for just then Rose tried to laugh at Dolly charging into the room with a warming-pan, but could not, for the sharp pain took her breath away and made her cry out.
Our greatness will appear Then most conspicuous, when great things of small, Useful of hurtful, prosperous of adverse We can create, and in what place so e're Thrive under evil, and work ease out of pain Through labour and endurance.
The little blistering voices of pain that had called out from his scalp were, he thought, definite in their expression of danger.
"Then it was a splendid imitation of a pain," retorted Tip, angrily.
The next letter brought intelligence that the malady was fast increasing; and the poor sufferer's horror of death was still more distressing than his impatience of bodily pain. All his friends had not forsaken him; for Mr.
And agreeably to this mode of thinking and speaking, were we not saying that they will have their pleasures and pains in common?
"I can't think of her," said Stephen, stamping as if with pain. "I can think of nothing but you, Maggie.
Tired as I was,--exhausted, in fact,--I was prevented from sleeping by the pain in my knee.
"Take it from me, when an animal won't give way to pain, it can't be broke.
The first of these theories, namely, that which regards discomfort and pleasure as actual contents in those who experience them, has, I think, nothing conclusive to be said in its favour.* It is suggested chiefly by an ambiguity in the word "pain," which has misled many people, including Berkeley, whom it supplied with one of his arguments for subjective idealism.
Talking wearied her, faces troubled her, pain claimed her for its own, and her tranquil spirit was sorrowfully perturbed by the ills that vexed her feeble flesh.