pall


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Related to pall: pallbearer
See: veil
References in classic literature ?
Beneath its purple pall, the face painted on the canvas could grow bestial, sodden, and unclean.
Mycroft lodges in Pall Mall, and he walks round the corner into Whitehall every morning and back every evening.
It is such as he, as little conscious of himself as the bee in a hive, who are the lucky in life, for they have the best chance of happiness: their activities are shared by all, and their pleasures are only pleasures because they are enjoyed in common; you will see them on Whit-Monday dancing on Hampstead Heath, shouting at a football match, or from club windows in Pall Mall cheering a royal procession.
And so, instead of crying because she was the merest nobody, she must, forsooth, sail jauntily down Pall Mall, very trim as to her tackle and ticketed with the insufferable air of an engaged woman.
From the Strand he crossed Trafalgar Square into Pall Mall, and up the Haymarket into Piccadilly.
Along Pall Mall the taxi in which she was seated gained considerably, but in the Park and along the Bird Cage Walk both the other taxies, risking the police regulations, drew almost alongside.
The two men who had walked up together arm in arm from Downing Street, stood for several moments in Pall Mall before separating.
We must pall the barge all its length in blackest samite.
He felt that this independent attitude of a man who might have done anything, but cared to do nothing was already beginning to pall, that many people were beginning to fancy that he was not really capable of anything but being a straightforward, good-natured fellow.
Sabin dined together - not, as it happened, at the House of Commons, but at the former's club in Pall Mall.
The "Typhoon" appeared in the early numbers of the Pall Mall Magazine, then under the direction of the late Mr.
The undertaker, instructed to spare no expense, provided long-tailed black horses, with black palls on their backs and black plumes upon their foreheads; coachmen decorated with scarves and jack-boots, black hammercloths, cloaks, and gloves, with many hired mourners, who, however, would have been instantly discharged had they presumed to betray emotion, or in any way overstep their function of walking beside the hearse with brass-tipped batons in their hands.