panderer


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Related to panderer: procuring

panderer

1) a person who panders or solicits for a prostitute. 2) some politicians catering to special interests. (See: pander)

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In this essay, I argue that Joni Mitchell's black male persona earned her legitimacy and authority in a rock music ideology in which her previous incarnation, white female folksinger, had rendered her either a naive traditionalist or an unscrupulous panderer.
The coming elections in America have become a contest between candidates who both try to be the leading panderer to Israel.
"He needs to come across as a statesman rather than a panderer and be careful not to lock himself into positions that would tie his hands down the road."
It led them to regard Beyala, who moves easily between France and Cameroon, as an arrivist, a panderer to right-wing prejudices and a trivializer (Beti 43-46).
The mimos, be it the poet or the woman, is "a panderer of reflections, a destroyer of forms" and a threat to the established values s/he mimics (Diamond 1997: v).
Even though he is afraid that he did not behave as an exemplary white male hunter, "that iron-nerved panderer to what a woman expects," Mary herself reassures her husband that she "understands" about not keeping too close to the gerenuk (65, 106-107, 179).
For instance, he tells the panderer Verdiana that he must lock the uscio to his house for fear of what might wind up on his head ("quello che mi potrebbe tornare in capo," 2.2), that is, someone might enter the house and have sex with his wife, thus placing a set of horns on his head.
Green Panderer. A panderer can be defined as someone who serves or caters to the passions or plans of others, often to make money.
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (16): 'panderer'; once again, two of the four texts cited in LSJ are from Lucian, while Reitz found it four times.
Charlton, in what Gross calls "the fullest defense of Shylock ever undertaken by a reputable scholar," similarly separates Shakespeare into the witting panderer to the Jew-hating mob and the artist who, "albeit unconsciously and perhaps quite unrecognizably to his contemporary audiences," modified the nature of his Jew into a kind of crypto-hero.
At the same time, mimesis, from the mime linked at its origins to female actors (Case 29), (7) is also the process of becoming "an other," "a shapeshifting Proteus, a panderer of reflections, a destroyer of forms," the mimesis of reflecting redefinition (Diamond v).
role of panderer: first, generating niche markets for diverse kinds of