Personality

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PERSONALITY. An abstract of personal; as, the action is in the personalty, that is, it is brought against a person for a personal duty which he owes. It also signifies what belongs to the person; as, personal property.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was 0.392 for paranoid personality disorder 0.880 for schizoid 0.890 dissocial 0.956 for emotionally unstable impulsive 0.938 for emotionally unstable borderline 0.941 for histrionic 0.842 for anankastic 0.927 for anxious and 0.894 for dependent personality disorder.
Paranoid personality disorder usually results from negative childhood experiences.
The research, which is likely to include neuroimaging, may help determine whether pathological bias should be considered as a symptom of certain disorders (such as paranoid personality disorder or bipolar disorder), or as a disorder in its own right.
He said one of them,Dr Cameron Boyd, has concluded Williams suffers from a paranoid personality disorder.
During the sixth hearing of Takuma's trial, the prosecution witness said he initially diagnosed Takuma with schizophrenia, but later determined he suffered from a paranoid personality disorder, after he conducted assessments of Takuma for about a two-year period after a 1999 incident.
He turns out to be nothing of the sort, just a mixed-up paranoid personality who killed a burglar with an illegal shotgun.
The appeal judges accepted new psychiatric evidence that Martin was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder when he fatally shot 16-year-old Fred Barras with a pump-action shotgun and wounded Brendon Fear-on, now 30, at remote Bleak House, Emneth Hungate, near Emneth, Norfolk, on the night of August 20, 1999.
An individual with a paranoid personality disorder is characteristically suspicious and distrustful of others.
The authors recognize that a paranoid personality cannot automatically be assumed to be behind every paranoid political strategy or act.
Volume 2 of Kostiuk's memoirs contains memorable profiles of his fellow writers Arkadii Liubchenko, Iurii Klen (Oswald Burghardt), Ivan Bahrianyi, Ulas Samchuk, Halyna Zhurba, Mykola Shlemkevych, Todos' Os'machka, and Iurii Kosach; the best and most extensive of these is the colorful portrait of Os'machka, a prominent Ukrainian poet and Shakespeare translator with an eccentric and paranoid personality, whose behavior created all kinds of comic and tragic episodes.
For instance, the manual portrays paranoid personality disorder as an ingrained distrust and suspiciousness of others' motives, while the symptoms of histrionic personality disorder include excessive emotional displays and constant attention seeking.