parricide

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parricide

1 the act of killing either of one's parents.
2 a person who kills his parent.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

PARRICIDE, civil law. One who murders his father; it is applied, by extension, to one who murders his mother, his brother, his sister, or his children. The crime committed by such person is also called parricide. Merl. Rep. mot Parricide; Dig. 48, 9, 1, 1. 3, 1. 4.
     2. This offence is defined almost in the same words in the penal code of China. Penal Laws of China, B. 1, s. 2, Sec. 4.
     3. The criminal was punished by being scourged, and afterwards sewed in a sort of sack, with a dog, a cock, a viper, and an ape, and then thrown into the sea, or into a river; or if there were no water, he was thrown in this manner to wild beasts. Dig. 48, 9, 9; C. 9, 17, 1, 1. 4, 18, 6; Bro. Civ; Law, 423; Wood's Civ. Law, B. 3, c. 10, s. 9.
     4. By the laws of France parricide is the crime of him who murders his father or mother, whether they, be the legitimate, natural or adopted parents of the individual, or the murder of any other legitimate ascendant. Code Penal, art. 297. This crime is there punished by the criminal's being taken to the place of execution without any other garment than his shirt, barefooted, and with his head covered with a black veil. He is then exposed on the scaffold while an officer of the court reads his sentence to the spectators; his right hand is then cut off, and he is immediately put to death. Id. art. 13.
     5. The common law does not define this crime, and makes no difference between its punishment, and the punishment of murder. 1 Hale's P. C. 380; Prin. Penal Law, c. 18, Sec. 8, p. 243; Dalloz, Dict. mot Homicide.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The evocation of this contradiction was institutionalized in our first president and was always a parricidal threat that served to remind the newly independent (white) nation of its potentially revolutionary excluded (slave) Others.
Pound's defining dictum, "make it new," offers the archetypal modernist impulse: the severing of all ties with the past, what Paul de Man calls the "parricidal ...
[9] Durkheim's political sociology, Richter proposed, could in fact be seen as the "parricidal offspring" of Aristotelian political science (1960: 170).
The 'intricacies of plot [are] the result of complex and contradictory forces ...: the wish to belong and the wish to break free, the quest for identity and the fear of disgraceful identification, the innate filial piety of Telemachus and the parricidal yearnings of Oedipus' (x).
What power Herman Roth has to persist as the father, as the conscience of his son, emerges in Roth's allusions to Hamlet and in his comical report of the "parricidal driver" who chauffeurs him to the hospital where his father is undergoing an MRI (161).
Yet this meticulous re-creation of one of our most comforting cinematic images only sets the viewer up for a harder shock when the traditional post-oedipal reconciliation between drill sergeant and the fat recruit(31) is replaced by a burst of parricidal and then suicidal gunfire.(32)
Is there an alternative to the competitive "anxiety of influence" model of academic reviewing which positions the reviewer in parricidal (or matricidal) opposition to the author?
In addition, Paine's parricidal rage generates another connective theme in the Letter: Washington's "ingratitude" to Paine and France is at one with America's ingratitude to Paine and France.
The same metaphor, which pretends to be more than a metaphor insofar as it tries to point out the cruel complicity between "writing" and "reality," will reappear in the Discours de Jules Cesar,(57) a lengthy, incomplete, and of course never published meditation on the Roman dictator's, the king's, and the poet's similar confrontation (and temptation) with rebellion and "parricidal" violence.
you killed him."(7) Wilderness, the novel of 1961, also revives the Oedipus story with its clubfooted hero, who assumes parricidal guilt over the death of his putative father-figure, Aaron Blaustein - just as Rau-Ru had done vis-a-vis Hamish Bond in Band of Angels.
(Similar conclusions are reached in the essays by Herendeen on Jonson's dedications and by Joseph Loewenstein on the Folio texts of the masques.) Brady considers the way in which, in the 1620s and 1630s, 'parricidal' Sons of Ben used the 1616 collection 'To hold Jonson hostage to a remembered perfection'.
The novel's parricidal ending is a foregone conclusion by the close of its first and briefest volume, but one problem seems to trouble what would otherwise be a fairly predictable tale of paranormal vengeance.