Pass

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Pass

As a verb, to utter or pronounce, as when the court passes sentence upon a prisoner. Also to proceed; to be rendered or given, as when judgment is said to pass for the plaintiff in a suit.

In legislative parlance, a bill or resolution is said to pass when it is agreed to or enacted by the house, or when the body has sanctioned its adoption by the requisite majority of votes; in the same circumstances, the body is said to pass the bill or motion.

When an auditor appointed to examine any accounts certifies to their correctness, she is said to pass them; i.e., they pass through the examination without being detained or sent back for inaccuracy or imperfection.

The term also means to examine anything and then authoritatively determine the disputed questions that it involves. In this sense a jury is said to pass upon the rights or issues in litigation before them.

In the language of conveyancing, the term means to move from one person to another; i.e. to be transferred or conveyed from one owner to another.

To publish; utter; transfer; circulate; impose fraudulently. This is the meaning of the word when referring to the offense of passing counterfeit money or a forged paper.

As a noun, permission to pass; a license to go or come; a certificate, emanating from authority, wherein it is declared that a designated person is permitted to go beyond certain boundaries that, without such authority, he could not lawfully pass. Also a ticket issued by a railroad or other transportation company, authorizing a designated person to travel free on its lines, between certain points or for a limited time.

PASS. In the slave states this word signifies a certificate given by the master or mistress to a slave, in which it is stated that he is permitted to leave his home, with the authority of his master or mistress. The paper on which such certificate is written is also called a pass.

PASS, practice. To be given, or entered; to proceed; as, let the judgment pass for the plaintiff.

TO PASS. To accomplish, to complete, to decide.
     2. The title to goods passes by the sale whenever the parties have agreed upon the sale and the price, and nothing remains to be done to complete the agreement. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 939.
     3. When a jury decide upon the rights of the parties, which are in issue, they are said to pass upon them.

References in periodicals archive ?
IN years to come when they are on the political scrapheap, will Lib Dems pass the time of day by asking one another: "Can you remember where you were when Kennedy was assassinated?"
Then, there is always a healthy assortment of regulars who are keen to pass the time of day chatting.
They all had the decency to pass the time of day, yet you think they're snobs and have no time for the fans.
Another local said: "They were quiet people who would wave and pass the time of day.
"I would like to publicly acknowledge that Gordon did have a genteel side and he only wanted to pass the time of day.
Walk down any British road and pass the time of day with a teenager and you'll be met with blank stares.
'I used to chat to her and pass the time of day. She was always asking if I was all right.'
It costs nothing to pass the time of day with your neighbour, but it is arguable that the results of doing so, both in personal and community terms, can be priceless.
People find time to pass the time of day. It's a rare phenomenon that's getting ever rarer, and no less pleasing a sight for that.
To walk a lonely mile Along a country lane To do it not just once But time and time again One's mind begins to wander Of the days that long gone by Of friends one's loved and now have lost Would bring a tear to peoples' eye If only one could see a friendly face Just to pass the time of day Then that lonely mile that one had walked Would change in every way Friends are more important That should never be ignored Than all the money in this world Because true friendship can never be flawed
"We just used to pass the time of day occasionally.
Harry Cohen could be seen, almost all the time, pressing suits on his steam press in the window of his shop - always smiling and ready to pass the time of day with anyone who passed.