Pass

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Pass

As a verb, to utter or pronounce, as when the court passes sentence upon a prisoner. Also to proceed; to be rendered or given, as when judgment is said to pass for the plaintiff in a suit.

In legislative parlance, a bill or resolution is said to pass when it is agreed to or enacted by the house, or when the body has sanctioned its adoption by the requisite majority of votes; in the same circumstances, the body is said to pass the bill or motion.

When an auditor appointed to examine any accounts certifies to their correctness, she is said to pass them; i.e., they pass through the examination without being detained or sent back for inaccuracy or imperfection.

The term also means to examine anything and then authoritatively determine the disputed questions that it involves. In this sense a jury is said to pass upon the rights or issues in litigation before them.

In the language of conveyancing, the term means to move from one person to another; i.e. to be transferred or conveyed from one owner to another.

To publish; utter; transfer; circulate; impose fraudulently. This is the meaning of the word when referring to the offense of passing counterfeit money or a forged paper.

As a noun, permission to pass; a license to go or come; a certificate, emanating from authority, wherein it is declared that a designated person is permitted to go beyond certain boundaries that, without such authority, he could not lawfully pass. Also a ticket issued by a railroad or other transportation company, authorizing a designated person to travel free on its lines, between certain points or for a limited time.

PASS. In the slave states this word signifies a certificate given by the master or mistress to a slave, in which it is stated that he is permitted to leave his home, with the authority of his master or mistress. The paper on which such certificate is written is also called a pass.

PASS, practice. To be given, or entered; to proceed; as, let the judgment pass for the plaintiff.

TO PASS. To accomplish, to complete, to decide.
     2. The title to goods passes by the sale whenever the parties have agreed upon the sale and the price, and nothing remains to be done to complete the agreement. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 939.
     3. When a jury decide upon the rights of the parties, which are in issue, they are said to pass upon them.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, a total of 1008 female drivers sat their test for the first time in Airdrie, with 441 passing (43.8 per cent).
The passing out batch consisted of 700 men and women, with 217 women taking part in the passing out parade.
put my ear to the mouth of an old man Emoyeni passing passing, is what
Good teams generally post better statistics than bad teams for both possession and passing accuracy.
43.8% EFC v LFC Passing Stats 359 Total accurate passes 257 478 Total passes 357 400 Total Open Play passes 314 314 Accurate Open Play passes 241 79% Open Play Pass completion 77% 39% Open Play pass forwards 48% 11% Open Play pass backwards 16% 26% Open play pass to left 16% 24% Open play pass to right 20% 34 Total Crosses 17 9 Chances created Open Play 8 4 Chances created setplay 2 14 Total chances created 11 5 Backpasses 13 100/154 Attacking third passes 63/103 What do you think?
5 : showing satisfactory work in a test or course of study <a passing mark>
The area with the oldest average age for people passing their test is Maida Vale in north west London, with a figure of 21.9 years.
Kidd says he's seen little evidence in the province's new road plans that passing lanes are in the offing for the northern half of Highway 11.
Most of the rest of America will think we're idiots." But similar resolutions kept passing in towns across the country.
Passing Novels in the Harlem Renaissance: Identity, Politics and Textual Strategies.
Passing: When People Can't Be Who They Are by Brooke Kroeger PublicAffairs Books, September 2003 $25.00, ISBN 1-891-62099-1
In fact, the system worked wonderfully because it deterred tampering, reduced waste, and helped dramatically reduce errors associated with passing medication.