peaceable possession


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peaceable possession

adj. in real estate, holding property without any adverse claim to possession or title by another.

References in classic literature ?
I left him in peaceable possession of the city of York, and the whole surrounding neighborhood.
So the dogs remain in peaceable possession of the streets.
He told reporters on Monday that a memorandum of understanding signed by the petitioner and respondents including representatives of 17 government departments agreed on the peaceable possession of land acquired for the Rs16 billion housing project.
In Canada's Criminal Code, colour of right is a defence where one forcibly enters land that is in the actual and peaceable possession of another (section 72), or commits theft of property (sections 322 and 326) or fraudulently uses credit card data or a computer (sections 342 and 342.1).
Defense of one's home is provided enhanced protection under Canadian law: Everyone who is in peaceable possession of a dwelling, and everyone lawfully assisting him or acting under his authority, is justified in using as much force as is necessary to prevent any person from forcibly breaking into or forcibly entering the dwelling without lawful authority.
If possible, the tenant would associate the two families in the foundational events of the seventeenth-century plantation or with continuous "peaceable possession" over a long period.
The court also rejected a claim that the protesters were in peaceable possession of the park and used only reasonable force to protect their property against tresspass by the tactical unit.
and layde vpon the necke of England." Davies, conversely, maintains that William governed both native Saxons and Norman colonists by "the ancient common law of England long before the Conquest" and therefore "obtained a peaceable possession of the kingdom within few years."(51) For Spenser, that is, civilizing the barbarian requires the forcible imposition of an alien order; for Davies, who strongly condemns the refusal of the Anglo-Irish to grant common law privileges to the "mere Irish," the same project is reconfigured as extending the benefits of common law to the lower orders rather than forcing it down the Irish's throats.