pedestrian

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If we think of pedestrianism in the context of contemporary cities--unless there is a physical impediment--everybody has to keep on walking regardless of the number of mobility technologies available.
Without exception, the individual chapters are located on a high intellectual level and written in a lucid style by scholars who manage to steer clear of the pitfalls of academic obscurity on the one hand and pedestrianism on the other.
It began with Edward Payson Weston--the Father of Modern Pedestrianism.
His sources revealed that in urban areas horse race meetings, cricket, pedestrianism and pugilism were the most commonly reported events, and that coverage of some sports increased.
Browning reimagined Pheidippides at the height of the so-called Golden Age of Pedestrianism.
She teaches and researches in the areas of transportation planning and finance, and the history of pedestrianism.
12) See Stephen Donovan (2005) for a discussion (in Chapter 2 on tourism) of the "holiday atmosphere" as organising principle of Chance, the intertextual resonances with popular contemporary texts on pedestrianism, and the way in which the landcape as gendered space structures the novel.
Identifying its primary viewing habits as shaped by "the ethics and aesthetics of pedestrianism" (85), Shaughnessy argues that the theatre's inclination toward a monolithic authenticity is thwarted by this pedestrianism and its resultant "ambulatory improvisation" (87), which privileges the audience's ability to resist the monolithic.
The pastoral and spiritual priorities of the rabbinate and the American synagogue leave little time other than an occasional weekend for serious educational pursuits, and the academic world has generally chosen to avoid what it perceives to be the pedestrianism of organized American Jewry.
Yet from Rousseau to Hugo and Sand, through Senancour, Nodier, and Nerval, with scenic detours to the less well-known Charles Didier and to the Swiss Rodolphe Topffer, we find that there runs an unbroken thread of francophone pedestrianism, a genuine if often muted enthusiasm for walking that translated into a stock of literary themes and formal practices.
In the 1850s the sporting world was dominated by such events as horse races, aquatic events (yacht races and rowing matches), canine events (dogs killing rats), cockfighting, pugilism (boxing matches, with and without gloves), and pedestrianism (walking contests, such as a one-against-one match or a single contestant against the clock).
Houston-based builder/developer Hahnfeld Witmer Davis is using the venerable housing type to promote pedestrianism and what principal Robert Davis refers to as the "chance meeting" on the street.