References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan, stranger as he was to all the manners of a court, could not but perceive a little coldness in this reception.
This he undoubtedly had learnt from Anna-- and then Sandford was very much like Stanley--his patch, his dress, his air--every thing about him united to confirm her impressions; and Julia, at the same time she resolved to conduct herself towards him in their journey with a proper feminine reserve, thought she could do no less to a man who submitted to so much to serve her, than to suffer him to perceive that she was not entirely insensible to the obligation.
However whole the character and the man may remain after the fatigues of a voyage, the traveler perceives with pleasure, at the close of the day -- even though the day has been a fine one -- that night is approaching, and will bring a little sleep with it.
He looks round in vain for the hunter; the whole landscape is lifeless and deserted: at length he perceives a thread of smoke, curling up from among the crags and cliffs, and scrambling to the place, finds some forlorn and skulking brood of Diggers, terrified at being discovered.
He perceives it in the songs of birds--in the harp of Bolos --in the sighing of the night-wind--in the repining voice of the forest-- in the surf that complains to the shore--in the fresh breath of the woods --in the scent of the violet--in the voluptuous perfume of the hyacinth--in the suggestive odour that comes to him at eventide from far distant undiscovered islands, over dim oceans, illimitable and unexplored.
She soon finished her eating, and having a consciousness that Clare was regarding her, began to trace imaginary patterns on the tablecloth with her forefinger with the constraint of a domestic animal that perceives itself to be watched.
He perceives with astonishment that supposing the present government to be overthrown, the limited choice of the Crown, in the formation of a new ministry, would lie between Lord Coodle and Sir Thomas Doodle--supposing it to be impossible for the Duke of Foodle to act with Goodle, which may be assumed to be the case in consequence of the breach arising out of that affair with Hoodle.
He perceives the independence of the thought on the symbol, the stability of the thought, the accidency and fugacity of the symbol.
As the reader perceives, the pillory of the Grève was far from presenting all the recreations of the pillory of the Halles.
In fact, when one comes to read the story of his life, and to know that he was really and lastingly ashamed of having once put up shoe-blacking as a boy, and was unable to forgive his mother for suffering him to be so degraded, one perceives that he too was the slave of conventions and the victim of conditions which it is the highest function of his fiction to help destroy.
What inhabitant of the earth perceives its speed, which, however, is at the rate of 68,000 miles per hour?
Nor let it be thought that some great deviation of structure would be necessary to catch the fancier's eye: he perceives extremely small differences, and it is in human nature to value any novelty, however slight, in one's own possession.