perception

(redirected from perceiving)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

perception

the collection, receipt, or taking into possession of rents or crops.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in classic literature ?
I understand your feeling," continued he, perceiving that I wished to interrupt him; "but you are mistaken, my friend, if thus you will allow me to name you; nothing can alter my destiny; listen to my history, and you will perceive how irrevocably it is determined."
The first that he came upon was the pummelled Don Quixote, who lay stretched senseless on his back upon his broken-down bed, and, his hand falling on the beard as he felt about, he continued to cry, "Help for the Jurisdiction!" but perceiving that he whom he had laid hold of did not move or stir, he concluded that he was dead and that those in the room were his murderers, and with this suspicion he raised his voice still higher, calling out, "Shut the inn gate; see that no one goes out; they have killed a man here!" This cry startled them all, and each dropped the contest at the point at which the voice reached him.
Then, feigning a tiff, he would close his manuscript, and all the ladies with their birdlike voices would beseech him with "Oh, no, Messer Firenzuola, please go on again; it's SO charming!" while, as if by accident, Madonna Selvaggia's moonlike bosom would once more slip out its heavenly silver, perceiving which, Messer Firenzuola would open his manuscript again and proceed with his sweet learning.
Men tended to rate their health better than women, with 70.1 per cent of men aged 16 or over in the EU perceiving their health as very good or good in 2016, compared to 65.2 per cent for women.
Parent sex, parent indoor tanning use, and adolescents' skin reactivity were associated with perceiving high indoor tanning benefits.
When perceiving social exclusion, they react conservatively to the outside world and adopt a strong preventative motivation to resist outside influences (Park & Baumeister, 2015).
Decomposition of the two-way interaction suggests that when perceived parental approval of drinking is low, college students perceiving parental monitoring as high consume alcohol less frequently than those perceiving lower parental monitoring.