perception

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perception

the collection, receipt, or taking into possession of rents or crops.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
He wrote with a terrible scorn of Clive Bell's pacifism and aestheticism, and with a cruel perceptiveness and lack of what would now be called political correctness about the women, or `harem', attending Bergson's lectures.
I would not have thought that it was possible for a man of Samuelson's perceptiveness to write a book about the future of American society without even noticing that many people in this country (not just liberal intellectuals) think that the future will look like a scene from Blade Runner and at least feeling some obligation to say why they are wrong.
So combines the simple lyricism of Portuguese traditional poetry with the more refined perceptiveness of Symbolism.
What we do know is: The solution, whatever it may be, will require perceptiveness, perseverance, and singularity of purpose.
Your sensitivity is enhanced which can give you very great perceptiveness, but equally this can get blurred by strange anxieties that can rise from the depths.
They represent a diversity of viewpoints but are united in their intelligence, perceptiveness and writing skill.
The opposition camp ''should approve'' the nomination after confirming the candidate's personality and perceptiveness at such open forums as Diet sessions, he said.
At every step of the way, Kim and cinematographer Matthew Clark show a heightened perceptiveness to the contours and barriers of Sophie and Jihah's relationship--what's acceptable and what isn't--as expressed in the physicality of sex.
With the Moon in your sign, utilise your natural perceptiveness, especially with regard to friendships or romance.
Jam-packed with Parsons' trademark perceptiveness and sensitivity, and written in his familiar rhythmic prose, The Family Way tackles the issues of family and having children with aplomb.
These bear witness to the author's erudition and perceptiveness, and often show originality in unexpected juxtapositions or a particular focus.
The book is a series of mutually reinforcing readings, not just of texts, but of their potentials for performance: one of Cartwright's distinctive strengths is his perceptiveness about possible stagings and their impacts.