permeative


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Caption: Figure 3: A 35-year-old male with frontal radiograph of the distal right forearm: there is permeative mixed sclerosis and lucency in the distal radial and ulnar metaphysis and epiphysis (arrows).
Add to that the revelation that Agrarian modernism was itself infected by the permeative presence of industrial capitalism to no less degree than they claimed was the regionalists' version, and it becomes impossible to maintain that Southern modernism can or should be represented only by the Agrarian model.
Table 2 Comparison of Some Different Types of Chondrosarcomas Conventional Clear Cell Chondrosarcoma Chondrosarcoma Incidence Age 50+ (rare in Ages 20 to 50; younger people) twice as common among men than women Radiologic Appearance Radiolucent lesion Thin sclerotic bor- with ring-like opaci- der with a central ties; lobular outline zone of bone destruction; calcifi- cations possible Mesenchymal Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma Chondrosarcoma Incidence Very rare; occurs in Older patients (age late adolescence or 70+) 20s Radiologic Appearance Cartilaginous tumor May be mistaken for with calcifications; conventional chon- permeative bone drosarcoma; histologi- destruction cal analysis required
Permeative bone destruction is another recognized pattern of osseous involvement which often has associated periosteal reaction and soft tissue disease.
Radiographically, most low-grade osteosarcomas involve the metadiaphysis with cortical bone destruction and a permeative growth pattern.
Radiographic evaluation with plain films revealed a permeative, moth-eaten lesion of the left proximal tibia.
This contrasts with "the Chinese-Vietnamese formula of direct, permeative, bureaucratic management", with the emphasis on bureaucracy.
13) The tumour may involve both the extraconal and intraconal compartment, many cause permeative bone destruction (50%).
Classically, Ewing's is described as a diaphyseal-based, permeative lesion with a wide ZOT and aggressive periostitis (Figure 13).
13) Cortical destruction is invariably present, with the pattern of bone destruction described as geographic, moth-eaten, and/or permeative.
The lesions may also appear as permeative lesions with ill-defined borders and periosteal reaction.
1,5) The early radiographic manifestations of osteomyelitis consist of permeative metaphyseal osteolysis, endosteal erosions, intracortical Assuring and periostitis.