References in classic literature ?
uf would have replied, but Prince John's petulance and levity got the start.
A half- repressed word, a moment's unexpected silence, even an easy fit of petulance on our account, will serve us as hashish for a long while.
Madame Urbain, with a certain attractive petulance, beckoned to him again, and this time he went over to the carriage.
The very anger in her voice was silvery, as it were, and more like the petulance of a seventeen- year-old beauty.
She derived, however, great consolation, (during the tightening of the bowstring,) from the reflection that much of the history remained still untold, and that the petulance of her brute of a husband had reaped for him a most righteous reward, in depriving him of many inconceivable adventures.
A gentleman entered, with a pleasant, cultured face, high-nosed and pale, with something perhaps of petulance about the mouth, and with the steady, well-opened eye of a man whose pleasant lot it had ever been to command and to be obeyed.
Thank heaven that there were two sane men--Lord John Roxton and myself--to prevent the petulance and folly of our learned Professors from sending us back empty-handed to London.
One look at the face of heaven and earth lays all petulance at rest, and soothes us to wiser convictions.
His manner varies from genial bullying when he is in a good humor to stormy petulance when anything goes wrong; but he is so entirely frank and void of malice that he remains likeable even in his least reasonable moments.
No more of the girlish alternations of timidity and petulance, the adorable naivete, the reveries, the tears, the playfulness.
She felt so now about herself; and when her first petulance was over, resolved to give up coasting and everything else, rather than have any nonsense with Tom, who, thanks to his neglected education, was as ignorant as herself of the charms of this new amusement for school-children.
Oh I dare say, Miss La Creevy,' returned Mrs Nickleby, with a petulance not unnatural in her unhappy circumstances, 'it's very easy to say cheer up, but if you had as many occasions to cheer up as I have had--and there,' said Mrs Nickleby, stopping short.