domestic

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Domestic

Pertaining to the house or home. A person employed by a household to perform various servient duties. Any household servant, such as a maid or butler. Relating to a place of birth, origin, or domicile.

That which is domestic is related to household uses. A domestic animal is one that is sufficiently tame to live with a family, such as a dog or cat, or one that can be used to contribute to a family's support, such as a cow, chicken, or horse. When something is domesticated, it is converted to domestic use, as in the case of a wild animal that is tamed.

Domestic relations are relationships between various family members, such as a Husband and Wife, that are regulated by Family Law.

A domestic corporation of a particular state is one that has been organized and chartered in that state as opposed to a foreign corporation, which has been incorporated in another state or territory. In tax law, a domestic corporation is one that has originated in any U.S. state or territory.

Domestic products are goods that are manufactured within a particular territory rather than imported from outside that territory.

domestic

(Household), adjective belonging to the house, domiciliary, family, home, homemaking, household, housekeeping, internal, pertaining to one's household, perraining to the family, pertaining to the home, relating to the family, relating to the home
Associated concepts: domestic animals, domestic duties, domestic employment, domestic fixtures, domestic purroses, domestic relations, domestic servants, domestic service, domestic status, domestic use

domestic

(Indigenous), adjective endemic, home, homemade, local, national, native, native grown, not forrign, not imported
Associated concepts: domestic commerce, domestic corpooation, domestic judgment
See also: internal, local, national, native, residential

domestic

slang expression for an incident of violence in the home between a man and a woman.
References in classic literature ?
A carrier pigeon on a passage can achieve a high rate of speed, and Winn reefed again.
The pigeon drove straight on for the Alameda County shore, and it was near this shore that Winn had another experience.
At an altitude of five hundred feet, the pigeon drove on over the town of Berkeley and lifted its flight to the Contra Costa hills.
The pigeon was now flying low, and where a grove of eucalyptus presented a solid front to the wind, the bird was suddenly sent fluttering wildly upward for a distance of a hundred feet.
Two or more ranges of hills the pigeon crossed, and then Winn saw it dropping down to a landing where a small cabin stood in a hillside clearing.
A man, reading a newspaper, had just started up at the sight of the returning pigeon, when be heard the burr of Winn's engine and saw the huge monoplane, with all surfaces set, drop down upon him, stop suddenly on an air-cushion manufactured on the spur of the moment by a shift of the horizontal rudders, glide a few yards, strike ground, and come to rest not a score of feet away from him.
Peter Winn gripped his son's hand in grim silence, and fondled the pigeon which his son had passed to him.
This being just double their value, the man was very glad to close the bargain, and the nurse found herself in undisputed possession of the pigeons of her master's envious neighbour.
In the course of their wanderings, these pigeons with others visited the Hague, Loewestein, and Rotterdam, seeking variety, doubtless, in the flavour of their wheat or hempseed.
Chance, or rather God, for we can see the hand of God in everything, had willed that Cornelius van Baerle should happen to hit upon one of these very pigeons.
Horses were loaded with the dead; and, after this first burst of sporting, the shooting of pigeons became a business, with a few idlers, for the remainder of the season, Richard, however, boasted for many a year of his shot with the
cricket;” and Benjamin gravely asserted that he thought they had killed nearly as many pigeons on that day as there were Frenchmen destroyed on the memorable occasion of Rodney’s victory.