pity

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pity

noun commiseration, compassion, condolement, condolence, consolation, feeling, fellow feeling, fellow sufferrng, fellowship in sorrow, kindliness, lenience, leniency, lenity, mercifulness, mercy, misericordia, quarter, ruth, sympathy
Associated concepts: amnesty, clemency, pardon
See also: lenience, relent, sympathize
References in periodicals archive ?
Pitiably, even though the narrator feels insecure witnessing the violence against the Romanian, he feels like hugging Jamie's baby instead of saving the immigrant victim from further abuse.
55) While Dick refrains from a detailed comparison of texts, he describes Knolles's Historie as having 'all the qualities pitiably lacking in all the sources as far claimed: superb amplitude of detail, extraordinary narrative and dramatic vigor, and an epic sweep of style and conception'.
Pitiably, the energy sector in this country has not been developed to its full potential, thereby limiting its accessibility by the population and hampering socio-economic development.
Saval cites fictional depictions of the early office--stories like Herman Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener," with its "pallidly neat, pitiably respectable" clerk protagonist--as primary sources on the history of office work.
People consider it a healthy activity to visit Bagh but this spot pitiably dampens their hopes due to lack of facilities particularly closure of public toilets.
Her book is her only defense against the eyes upon her and she finds that it, too, has grown pitiably small: "And too old--a little shabby, crumpled thing, nothing like my great book that I had worked on all day, day after day, while Bardia was dying" (289).
I do not know what the answer to your question is, but it is pitiably small.
The story's protagonist, Rollo Martins, is, in fact, almost naively insensible to despair, a pitiably inept and "cheerful fool" (13).
The primary enrolment is pitiably short of universality because of adopting theoretical approach than practical.
20) In their edgily boundless performance, the two "talented mimics" draw the usually disparate Palestinian and Israeli worlds into one chaotic spectacle of travesty that "skips merrily from target to target, now a Palestinian one and now an Israeli one, each turning into and emerging from the others until all finally joined in one monstrous, pitiably conflicted figure--which, mumbling and grumbling in Hebrew and Arabic, sobbed and simpered as it struck and stroked itself" (233).
In addition to being marginalized as illiberal and unreasonable, the adherents of what is sometimes called "strong religion" are also often depicted as pitiably ignorant and unthinking--H.