place of abode

References in classic literature ?
Our poor place of abode, our humble calling, our assumed relationship, and our assumed name, are all used alike as a means of hiding us in the house-forest of London.
His place of abode was in Staffordshire, on a morsel of freehold land of his own--appropriately called Salt Patch.
To say the truth, I believe the youth himself would, from some prudent considerations, have preferred another place of abode at this time, had his terror on Sophia's account given him liberty to reflect a moment on what any otherways concerned himself, than as his love made him partake whatever affected her.
Being under a necessity of obeying our acoba, or protector, we changed our place of abode as often as he desired it, though not without great inconveniences, from the excessive heat of the weather and the faintness which our strict observation of the fasts and austerities of Lent, as it is kept in this country, had brought upon us.
She mentioned a common name, and an unknown and distant place of abode, but told me they were now on the Continent, and their present address was unknown to her.
Among the ships that were lost in the tempest was a vessel bound from Holland, which was wrecked on the rocky shore near Dermody's place of abode.
A more agreeable place of abode, during my stay in the neighbourhood, I could not have wished to find.
This little wandering journey, without settled place of abode, had been so unpleasant to me, that my own house, as I called it to myself, was a perfect settlement to me compared to that; and it rendered everything about me so comfortable, that I resolved I would never go a great way from it again while it should be my lot to stay on the island.
Favour me with an account of her--with her name, her parentage, her place of abode.
They had no strength with which to earn a living in a strange place and among strange people, even if they had been sure where to find a new place of abode.
When his youngest child was eight years old, his wife, who had long been languishing away--of her own inherent weakness, not that she retained any greater sensitiveness as to her place of abode than he did--went upon a visit to a poor friend and old nurse in the country, and died there.
So little did she know of him that she was even ignorant at that moment of his place of abode.