plaintiff's attorney

plaintiff's attorney

n. the attorney who represents a plaintiff (the suing party) in a lawsuit. In lawyer parlance a "plaintiff's attorney" refers to a lawyer who regularly represents persons who are suing for damages, while a lawyer who is regularly chosen by an insurance company to represent its insureds is called a "defense attorney." (See: plaintiff, defense attorney)

References in classic literature ?
To respond in damages is to contribute to the maintenance of the plaintiff's attorney and, incidentally, to the gratification of the plaintiff.
Freight brokers get sued for negligent selection or hiring when a plaintiff's attorney makes the argument that the accident would never have happened if the carrier had not been hired in the first place.
Plaintiff's attorney Zane Cagle said the case was appealed, though according to court records that appeal since has been dismissed.
A judgment-creditor plaintiff may have the ability to obtain discovery from the attorney of a judgment-debtor in instances where the plaintiff's attorney can prove the documents could have been obtained from the defendant by a court process when they were in their possession, a Fairfax circuit judge has ruled.
The abuse has stemmed from the third parties with a signed AOB working with plaintiff's attorney to sue an insurer when the insurer disputes an inflated bill from the third party.
at the start of trial and the parties argued damages, according to plaintiff's attorney Deborah L.
The plaintiff's attorney contacted the bureau concerning the conflict and wanted to settle the case.
According to plaintiff's attorney Jason Roth, in March 2013 the plaintiff, then 75, was driving her granddaughter to school when her 2009 Pontiac Vibe accelerated out of control, ran a stop sign and collided nearly head on with another vehicle as plaintiff attempted to gain control of her vehicle.
It is also common for a plaintiff's attorney in one state to tip off a fellow plaintiff's attorney in another state, who will then tip off another, and so on, creating a domino effect of class actions.
MCL 600.2912d says, in part, "(1) Subject to subsection (2), the plaintiff in an action alleging medical malpractice or, if the plaintiff is represented by an attorney, the plaintiff's attorney shall file with the complaint an affidavit of merit signed by a health professional who the plaintiff's attorney reasonably believes meets the requirements for an expert witness under section 2169.
Further, he erred when he refused to allow the plaintiff's attorney to cross-examine Dr.
I think, in retrospect clearly present in June and possibly even in March in the CAT scan imaging." He opined that delay in diagnosis had "no relation to her death." The plaintiff's attorney countered the defense's testimony with live expert testimony and by reading into the record the depositions of three of the decedent's treating physicians from Shands Teaching Hospital.