Plantations

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PLANTATIONS. Colonies, (q.v.) dependencies. (q.v.) 1 Bl. Com. 107. In England, this word, as it is used in St. 12, II. c. 18, is never applied to, any of the British dominions in Europe, but only to the colonies in the West Indies and America. 1 Marsh. Ins, B. 1, c. 3, Sec. 2, page 64.
     2. By plantation is also meant a farm.

References in classic literature ?
Davenport, a very celebrated minister, went, with other people, and began a plantation at New Haven.
I desire to depart in order to get properly drunk afar off and distant from this heavenly plantation.
He did not mention the money he owed me, but he said: `Here is a picture of your plantation that I've painted for you.
Handicrafts were taught in the days of slavery on most well-managed plantations.
Directly before him, across the twelve-mile channel, lay Florida Island; and, farther to the right, dim in the distance, he could make out portions of Malaita--the savage island, the abode of murder, and robbery, and man-eating--the place from which his own two hundred plantation hands had been recruited.
Only an hour before, Jerry had come down from the plantation house to the beach to see the Arangi depart.
Then the Arla dropped anchor at Reminge Plantation, on Guadalcanar, and Bertie landed on the beach with a sigh of relief and shook hands with the manager.
It was not altogether surprising that a plantation where seven human beings could be simultaneously effaced and nobody the wiser should be under some suspicion.
Some minutes elapsed before Laura would venture into the plantation, and before I could make up my mind to lead her back to the house.
The merchant in London, vesting this hundred pounds in English goods, such as the captain had written for, sent them directly to him at Lisbon, and he brought them all safe to me to the Brazils; among which, without my direction (for I was too young in my business to think of them), he had taken care to have all sorts of tools, ironwork, and utensils necessary for my plantation, and which were of great use to me.
I told him I had good reason not to go there to live, because if his plantations were worth so much there, I had not a fortune suitable to a gentleman of #1200 a year, as he said his estate would be.
It happened that the day before two of the Spaniards, having been in the woods, had seen one of the two Englishmen, whom, for distinction, I called the honest men, and he had made a sad complaint to the Spaniards of the barbarous usage they had met with from their three countrymen, and how they had ruined their plantation, and destroyed their corn, that they had laboured so hard to bring forward, and killed the milch-goat and their three kids, which was all they had provided for their sustenance, and that if he and his friends, meaning the Spaniards, did not assist them again, they should be starved.