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In comparing methods, various authors indicated that rectangular plots were the next best to circular plots, that plotless methods were less desirable, and that random-pairs and wandering-quarter methods were at the bottom of the ranking (Rice and Penfound, 1955; Cottam and Curtis, 1956; Lindsey et al.
In sections on the boring and the plotless, interpreting the disturbing and the difficult, and problems of authorship, they considers such topics as interpreting narrative technique in the plotless novels of Nicholson Baker, storytelling and species difference in animal comics, intertextuality and fragmentary narrative in Margaret Atwood's Alias Grace, name change and author avatars in Varlam Shalamov and Primo Levi, and a shadow on the marble.
Deliberately brainless, almost plotless, and wholly manufactured to suit 100- crore basics, Son Of Sardaar defines what modern mainstream has come to be.
Weiss applies these principles to both plotless works and his story ballets, which he tailors to fit his 34-member company.
Sucker Punch (12A) Zack Snyder's visually amazing, but incoherent, plotless trashy mashup of Girl Interrupted, Charlie's Angels and Sin City for action fantasy fans of girl power hotties in basques and fishnets.
It was a largely plotless tale, merely a series of episodes in one day of the narrator, Laura's, childhood who feels her world shift as adult concerns start to impact upon her.
An unsettling though largely plotless drama looking at the excesses of a group of 80s hedonists.
Incredible stunt work abounds in a plotless adventure that will no doubt please chop-socky fans, and which shows Chan in his prime.
Steve Coogan and Wales' own Rob Brydon have teamed up for this essentially plotless mix of 18th-Century period romp and Office-style cringing comedy.
The plotless "narrative" of more than one hundred canvases, rendered in a palette of marigold and pea soup, has only a general order, accumulating meaning frame by frame like an exploded comic book.
The Andalusian Dog (1928) Put Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali together and you know you're in for a freak show, and this plotless series of surrealistic images doesn't disappoint.
Fragmented and plotless, the novel concerns a group of Slovenians--scientists, artists, a few barely distinguishable handsome young men--all connected through their sexual encounters.