plural


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See: multiple

PLURAL. A term used in grammar, which signifies more than one.
     2. Sometimes, however, it may be so expressed that it means only one, as, if a man were to devise to another all he was worth, if he, the testator, died without children, and he died leaving one child, the devise would not take effect. See Dig. 50, 16, 148; Id. 35, 1, 101, 1; Id. 3 1, 17, 4 Code, 6, 49, 6, 2; Shelf. on L 559, 589. See Singular.

References in classic literature ?
Not even the shadow of a doubt was ever suggested; and Samuel made an intolerable misuse of the first person plural:
"But give me ornieres and lumieres in the plural, my dear Pelisson," said La Fontaine, clapping his hand on the shoulder of his friend, whose insult he had quite forgotten, "and they will rhyme."
It confuses the plurals; and, besides, nobody ever knows when he is in the Dative case, except he discover it by accident--and then he does not know when or where it was that he got into it, or how long he has been in it, or how he is going to get out of it again.
Newspaper reporters and certain miscreant lexicographers have decided that the word -- always in the plural -- shall mean "patronage" or "management"; as, "The festivities were under the auspices of the Ancient and Honorable Order of Body-Snatchers"; or, "The hilarities were auspicated by the Knights of Hunger."
Whenever he spoke of his house he always said "we", and spoke almost in the plural, like a king speaking.
"Exploits?" cried Lucy, wincing under the horrible plural.
Not the less does nature continue to fill the heart of youth with suggestions of this enthusiasm, and there are now men,--if indeed I can speak in the plural number,--more exactly, I will say, I have just been conversing with one man, to whom no weight of adverse experience will make it for a moment appear impossible that thousands of human beings might exercise towards each other the grandest and simplest sentiments, as well as a knot of friends, or a pair of lovers.
SOCRATES: Well then, for my own sake as well as for yours, I will do my very best; but I am afraid that I shall not be able to give you very many as good: and now, in your turn, you are to fulfil your promise, and tell me what virtue is in the universal; and do not make a singular into a plural, as the facetious say of those who break a thing, but deliver virtue to me whole and sound, and not broken into a number of pieces: I have given you the pattern.
He said they were five nation (we could not make him understand the plural
{156} Lower down (line 143) Euryclea says it was herself that had thrown the cloak over Ulysses--for the plural should not be taken as implying more than one person.
I truly believe that accessories have the power to transform outfits and give you a confidence boost,' says Plural and Co.
Sometimes a singular verb form is attached to the name of an organization such as, 'Family Booster Ministry' and sometimes a plural verb is attached to it, depending on the intention/discretion of the writer.