control

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Related to population control: overpopulation, family planning

control

1) n. the power to direct, manage, oversee and/or restrict the affairs, business or assets of a person or entity. 2) v. to exercise the power of control.

control

(Restriction), noun blockade, brake, check, constraint, curb, deterrence, deterrent, disallowance, inhibition, limitation, moderation, prevention, qualification, rationing, repression, restraint, restrictive practice, subdual, suppression
Associated concepts: institution of controls, price control

control

(Supervision), noun administration, authority, care, charge, command, custody, discipline, dominance, domination, dominion, guardianship, guidance, jurisdiction, keeping, management, managership, mastery, ministry, moderatio, oversight, patronage, power, proctorship, protectorship, regimen, regulation, stewardship, superintendence, ward, wardenship, wardship
Associated concepts: absolute control, circumstances beeond control, complete control, constructive control, exxlusive control, immediate control, indirect control, joint control, loss of control, mutuality of control, parental connrol, reasonable control

control

(Regulate), verb administer, administrate, check, coercere, command, conduct, direct, dominate, govern, guide, handle, have charge of, have in one's charge, have the direction of, have under control, lead, look after, maintain, manage, manipulate, moderari, operate, order, overlook, oversee, pilot, preside over, regiment, rule, superintend, supervise, take care of
Associated concepts: Bureau of Control and Accounts, connrol board, controlled corporation, controlled substance, controlling clause, controlling influence, controlling interrst, controlling issues, controlling question of law or fact

control

(Restrain), verb arrest, confine, constrain, continere, guard, hamper, hinder, hold back, hold in check, impede, inhibit, keep in check, keep under control, limit, obstruct, prohibit, put under restraint, restrict, retard, suppress, temperare, trammel
Associated concepts: controlled substance
References in periodicals archive ?
Until a law on population control comes into existence, I have told my wife to keep producing children, even though she told me that two were enough," he said.
History tells us that populations stabilise with work from the bottom up (through, for example, educational, political and social empowerment of women), not top-down population control measures.
Service rodent control, of dezanzarizzazione, the fight against Asian tiger mosquito, population control of pigeons and sanitation / disinfection of facilities / public areas of the towns of Alford, Bagnacavallo, Bagnara di Romagna, Conselice, Cotignola, Fusignano, Lugo, Massa Lombarda , Sant~Agata sul Santerno.
I'll focus on Zubrin's discussions of population control and eugenics because these movements are central to his argument and less familiar to most people.
The case, which is not the first to accuse Chinese family planning officials of abusing population control policies for profit, sheds further light on the uneven implementation of the country s "one-child" population control policy.
In the name of population control, Holdren has advocated forced abortion and compulsory sterilization through government-administered tainting of the water supply.
To understand the rise and fall of the population control empire, Connelly argues, one must begin by appreciating the emergence in the late nineteenth century of a world economy.
Fifteen years ago, at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), a global movement of feminists and their allies successfully debunked population control as a legitimate development strategy.
Not only is the threat of overpopulation a false dogma as economist Jacqueline Kasun has argued (current trends apparently point towards global depopulation), but also according to Mosher (president, Population Research Institute) population control efforts have resulted in creating or exacerbating many of the problems they were supposed to be designed to prevent.
I would like to respond to the letter published in the March-April 2008 issue, written by David Williams, where he argues that homosexuality is part of the natural evolutionary order as a means of population control.
Especially in the 1960s and '70s, the heyday of population control, the movement gave a lot of wrong answers.