possess

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possess

v. to own, have title to, occupy, physically hold or have under exclusive control. In wills there is often the phrase "of which I die possessed," in describing the estate. (See: possession)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 = about oneself in first person, 2 = (possessively) about own attributes, behaviors, and mental processes, 3 = others about oneself and one's attributes, behaviors, and mental processes, 4 = about construct-relevant indicators; S = staticity approach, F = frequency approach, V = valency approach, F + V = frequency and valency approach mixed together; A = attributal indicators, B = behavioral indicators, M = mental indicators, C = contextual indicators.
Apollo, who speaks in defence of Cupid, develops a worldview based on love: Cupid's work is to establish true love that does hOt look for its own profit but for that of the cherished other, (54) a definition that resembles the idea that Sophia ultimately wishes to convey to Philo, that is, to love her not possessively but selflessly,(55) According to Labe's Apollo, Cupid reverses hierarchies, (56) as love does in Ebreo's text; according to the god, the role of love is to create links, (57) Labe uses vocabulary that is reminiscent of Ebreo, as Anthony Perry bas shown for Sceve, Du Guillet, and Heroet.
Potato Head, and priced to move at eighl bucks a pop.The only man who'd yell possessively at a kid playing with his is a crazy one.
If they aren't allowed to guard livestock, the dog will possessively guard property, you, your family or other pets.
Anthony, Babe Ruth and Louis Armstrong is "mostly true." Deb Lucke gives a fresh perspective on taking a "time out" for what some people regard as bratty behavior - for instance, Napoleon Bonaparte's "timeout," or exile, for looking too possessively at other people's countries.
Helena for looking too possessively at other people's countries.
Provoking his silent consternation, six plump birds in mottled pink and blue--all facing outward--perch possessively around the rim of his crater head, a receptacle for bird droppings.
The introduction digests the different contributions these theorists make to a dominant narrative in early modern studies: that from the end of the medieval period to the beginning of the Victorian period, European culture saw a fundamental shift to a possessively individualized, self-disciplining subject; that this subject evolved to match or was part of the transformation of feudal structures to modern state formations; and that this entailed a corresponding shift in the social valuation and political meanings of everyday life--including what was to become the daily bourgeois work of disciplining the emotions, sentiments, and senses.
His repetition of the word "still" a total of five times in one sentence might appear to signal duration, but in many ways, it simply evokes the "Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita, Lolita" of an earlier moment of collapse: in this moment of purported love, Humbert Humbert's conception of time is not open and flee, but possessively iterative--literally and figuratively, Humbert insists that time stands "still," and that he sees that temporal stability in "this Lolita," who is, as she has always been, "his," regardless of appearances.
A person may also take I-positions of influences that are external' and personalise them possessively as mine'.
The gun's owner will place it carefully in a case during transit and will guard it possessively while it rests in a rack with other shooters' shotguns awaiting the next round.
But the scientific need for objectification, the fear of all that cannot be interpreted and decoded, the insistence that one must know possessively, no matter what, make many content to limit themselves to the serial aspect of the poem and, more destructively, to reduce that which is not serial, the moment of feeling, or Being, to what is usually called intentionality, and the moment of poetic expressiveness and listening, the moment of Becoming, to reader response or reception.