possess

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possess

v. to own, have title to, occupy, physically hold or have under exclusive control. In wills there is often the phrase "of which I die possessed," in describing the estate. (See: possession)

possess

verb acquire, adfirmatio, assume ownership, be in possession of, be in receipt of, be seized of, come into possession of, command, control, devolve upon, enjoy, enter into possession, gain, gain for oneself, get, get as one's own, habere, have, have a deed for, have a title to, have absolute disposal of, have as property, have at one's command, have at one's disposal, have for one's own, have in hand, have rights to, hold, keep, maintain, monopolize, obtain, occupy, own, receive, retain, secure, seize, take possession, tenere
Associated concepts: lawfully possess, seized or possessed
Foreign phrases: Aliud est possidere, aliud esse in possessione.It is one thing to possess; it is another to be in possession.
See also: appropriate, comprehend, impropriate, include, keep, obsess, obtain, occupy, own, remain, retain, shelter
References in periodicals archive ?
The gun's owner will place it carefully in a case during transit and will guard it possessively while it rests in a rack with other shooters' shotguns awaiting the next round.
But the scientific need for objectification, the fear of all that cannot be interpreted and decoded, the insistence that one must know possessively, no matter what, make many content to limit themselves to the serial aspect of the poem and, more destructively, to reduce that which is not serial, the moment of feeling, or Being, to what is usually called intentionality, and the moment of poetic expressiveness and listening, the moment of Becoming, to reader response or reception.
Boswell was thirty-one years younger than Johnson, Kinbote seventeen years younger than Shade, and both have possessively filial feelings toward their heroes and alter-egos.
She first met Lovell, 36, more than a year ago on the internet but as their friendship turned to romance she realised something wasn't right as Lovell's moods swung between loving and caring to possessively controlling.
There are any number of ambitious maps projected out from the perspective gained by these daily excursions that possessively seek to encompass larger parts of the terrain so that these perambulations can feel safer and more at home.
Analyzing sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English women's verse about dwelling places reveals that each poet's personal investment in power bears significantly on how she represents her speaker's relationship to property and to her place in poetic tradition--a tendency that differs radically from male poets' penchant for figuring themselves possessively in relation to property regardless of their actual riches or rank.
Tanya grows jealous and begins to act possessively, and the story culminates in her psychotic rampage at the film's end.
What is more, the late plays are notably populated by aging males whose wives are unexplainedly absent and who are possessively attached to their daughters.
The reason for this closure on data is that the data which one has already assimilated is one's personal property, personal territory, personal myth: data newly discovered by someone else is other people's property, with the discoverer and goodness knows who else still clinging to it possessively, and with the implicit threat of yet more discoveries to come; and for the political rationalist to admit that someone else might have more data, more understanding than oneself and cronies would be simply to throw oneself back into the quagmire of uncertainty from which one has triumphantly extricated oneself.
Tetterby is a small man with a large wife whom he possessively calls "my little woman" (342), doubly condescending in its language of ownership and its assumption that even a large woman is little, even to a little man.
8) At the same time, however, neoliberal institutionalists also argued that "the idea of politics [can be] equated with the need to develop social institutions (such as state and market) that conform more closely to a possessively individualist model of motivation and the propensity of ostensibly free individuals to pursue their material self-interest".
The events portrayed in Director Paul Goldman's The Night We Called It A Day are known intimately, and one could even say possessively, by many of my more mature mates as well as by the parents of my friends.