possessiveness


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Possessiveness involves the individual need to hold on to one's material possessions and thereby maintain one's individual status.
Anon, Cardiff A Yes, this is possessiveness; and possessiveness in the extreme when 'freaking out' is the response to a reasonable request to take a quick walk home alone or to see your mates.
An example of an ethos that is critical of the kind of religious possessiveness that leads to intransience can be found in the abovementioned midrash.
liana has numerous lovers and does not express a commonplace possessiveness or jealousy when she recognizes that Sayyid is also bedding others.
Prof Gruben said: "Neil Cramp-ton's relationship with Ms Sobo was characterised by his extreme jealousy and possessiveness.
Prof Gruben said: "Neil Crampton's relationship with Ms Sobo was characterised by his extreme jealousy and possessiveness.
To do this, the NZCPN needed to Lose the patch protection mentality (not easily done) and possessiveness of past work completed by the division/cortege.
Marisa begins to take school seriously and Rene starts to question his mother's destructive possessiveness.
Thus it is hardly a discovery that Alison Smithson w;is;i lYnmuii'al 'dilnr with her own agenda in Team X though more perhaps could be made over the Polish Catholic church's possessiveness about Auschwitz and its battle with international Jewry.
While much of the discussion centered around male violence against women, the broader topics included same-gender couple violence and possessiveness, jealousy, alienation of friends and warning signs of violent relationships.
For example, she says that possessiveness can 'ruin a relationship' (p.
She's married, vaguely happily, to the company's pencil-pushing nebbish Russell (Benjamin King), whose possessiveness doesn't really make up for his lack of romanticism.