practice

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Practice

Repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of similar kind; custom; usage. The exercise of any profession.

The form or mode or proceeding in courts of justice for the enforcement of rights or the redress of wrongs, as distinguished from the Substantive Law that gives the right or denounces the wrong. The form, manner, or order of instituting and conducting an action or other judicial proceeding, through its successive stages to its end, in accordance with the rules and principles laid down by law or by the regulations and precedents of the courts.

An attorney is actually engaged in the Practice of Law when she maintains an office, offers to perform legal services, describes herself as an attorney on letterheads or business cards, counsels clients, negotiates with other parties or opposing counsel, and fixes and collects fees for legal work. A doctor is practicing medicine when he discovers the cause and nature of diseases, treats illnesses and injuries, or prescribes and administers medical or surgical care. Lawyers and doctors must qualify for licenses before they may practice their professions.

practice

1) n. custom or habit as shown by repeated action, as in "it is the practice in the industry to confirm orders before shipping." 2) the legal business, as in "law practice," or "the practice of the law." 3) v. to repeat an activity in order to maintain or improve skills, as "he practices the violin every evening." 4) v. to conduct a law business, as "she practices law in St. Louis."

practice

(Custom), noun behavior, common course, confirmed habit, consuetude, conventionality, course of accion, course of conduct, customary course, established order, fixed ways, frequent repetition, general course, habit, habitual course, habituation, habitude, inveterate habit, line of action, line of proceeding, manner, matter of course, method, mode, mode of procedure, natural course, order of the day, ordinary course, pattern, prescription, procedure, routine, settled disposition, style, usage, use, usual custom, usual method, way
Associated concepts: custom and usage, practice in the industry
Foreign phrases: Cursus curiae est lex curiae.The practice of the court is the law of the court. Multa multo exercitaaione facilius quam regulis percipies. You will perceive many things much more easily by practice than by rule.

practice

(Procedure), noun approach, arrangement, conduct, consuetudo, course, course of action, course of conduct, established order, exercitatio, form, general guidelines, governing course of action, governing plan, line of action, line of conduct, manner of proceeding, method, mode, mode of management, mos, observance, operation, order of the day, organization, outline, plan of action, policy, prescribed form, prescribed usage, process, program, protocol, required manner, routine, rule, rules of business, scheme, stratagem, strategy, tactics, treatment, usual way, usus, way, way of doing things
Associated concepts: civil practice, criminal practice

practice

(Professional business), noun avocation, business, calling, career, chosen career, chosen field, chooen profession, employment, life, life's work, line of busiiess, line of work, occupation, pursuit, specialty, trade, vocation
Associated concepts: practice of law, practice of profession

practice

(Engage in), verb be employed, carry on business, devote oneself to, employ, employ one's professional skill, employ oneself in, engage in, exercere, facere, factitare, follow a calling, follow a profession, follow as an occupation, labor at one's vocation, perform the duties of, perform the functions of, pursue, specialize, specialize in, undertake, work at
Associated concepts: practice law

practice

(Train by repetition), verb acquire the habit, apply one's self to, become familiar with, condition, cultiiate a habit, discipline, do repeatedly, drill, exercise, famillarize with, learn a habit, meditari, perfect a routine, perform repeatedly, prepare, rehearse, school, take training, work at
See also: adhere to, behavior, business, calling, conduct, course, custom, dealings, deportment, discipline, employ, employment, exercise, expedient, experience, guide, habit, manner, method, mode, occupation, operate, operation, perform, ply, position, prescription, procedure, profession, protocol, pursue, pursuit, qualify, resort, rule, system, trade, usage, use

PRACTICE. The form, manner and order of conducting and carrying on suits or prosecutions in the courts through their various stages, according, to the principles of law, and the rules laid down by the respective courts.
     2. By practice is also meant the business which an attorney or counsellor does; as, A B has a good practice.
     3. The books on practice are very numerous; among the most popular are those Of Tidd, Chitty, Archbold, Sellon, Graham, Dunlap, Caines, Troubat and Haly, Blake, Impey.
     4. A settled, uniform, and loll, continued practice, without objection is evidence of what the law is, and such practice is based on principles which are founded in justice and convenience. Buck, 279; 2 Russ. R. 19, 570; 2 Jac. It. 232; 5 T. R. 380; 1 Y. & J. 167, 168; 2 Crompt. & M. 55; Ram on Judgm. ch. 7.

References in classic literature ?
Damsel,'' he said, ``if the pity I feel for thee arise from any practice thine evil arts have made on me, great is thy guilt.
For, as to that infamous practice of acquiring great employments by dancing on the ropes, or badges of favour and distinction by leaping over sticks and creeping under them, the reader is to observe, that they were first introduced by the grandfather of the emperor now reigning, and grew to the present height by the gradual increase of party and faction.
The very mirror of truth herself, she could not imagine that any one--least of all any woman--could be so false and cruel as to practice the artifice to which the milliner had resorted; and, here, just as she saw a way opened by which she might support both her grandmother and herself until the handkerchief was completed, a change threatened her, by which she was to be left altogether without food.
Let none be encouraged in their loose practices from this dexterous lady's management, for she is gone to her place, and I dare say has left nothing behind her that can or will come up on it.
As she progressed with her practice, she was surprised to see how steadily and surely the awe which had kept her tongue reverent and her manner humble toward her young master was transferring itself to her speech and manner toward the usurper, and how similarly handy she was becoming in transferring her motherly curtness of speech and peremptoriness of manner to the unlucky heir of the ancient house of Driscoll.
Miss Vanstone's resources stretch easily enough to the limits of our personal wants; including piano-forte hire for practice, and the purchase and making of the necessary dresses.
The first was to obey the laws and customs of my country, adhering firmly to the faith in which, by the grace of God, I had been educated from my childhood and regulating my conduct in every other matter according to the most moderate opinions, and the farthest removed from extremes, which should happen to be adopted in practice with general consent of the most judicious of those among whom I might be living.
Yet it has been found expedient, and has been the practice of Congress, to employ the inferior grades of public ministers, and to send and receive consuls.
The modern naval man must feel that the time has come for the tactical practice of the great sea officers of the past to be laid by in the temple of august memories.
But on the present occasion the man of practice was not to be obtained, and the duty fell, as a matter of course, to the share of Mr.
But, of course, it may not stand the test of practice.
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.