precatory


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precatory

adj. referring to a wish or advisory suggestion which does not have the force of a demand or a request which under the law must be obeyed. Thus "precatory words" in a will or trust would express a "hope that my daughter will keep the house in the family," but do not absolutely prevent her from selling it.

precatory

adjective advisory, appealing, asking, entreating, expressing entreaty, imploratory, importunate, pleading, suggesting, suggestive
Associated concepts: precatory words
References in periodicals archive ?
It does not address what religiously motivated conduct fell within the "free exercise [of religion]." Nor does it analyze whether the free exercise of religion in the state constitutions was enforceable or merely precatory. Nevertheless, its discussion of the three types of provisos addressed here should still aid understanding of the Free Exercise Clause and the soundness of Smith's core holding.
Note that both the binding Missouri ethics rule and the precatory ABA standard are violated only if a prosecutor "knows" that a proposed charge is "not supported by probable cause." (30) The evidence that Mr.
As mentioned above, it would not have suitability to talk about payment through precatory due to debt contracted in court for the unlawful act committed in the exercise of the Postal Bank.
24, 2008) (although not considering the admissibility of the warning letter, stating that "this Court believes that the precatory language in the FDA letter, namely that '[t]he specific violations noted in this letter are serious and may be symptomatic of serious underlying problems,' was enough to put Defendants on notice that problems with functions ...
(163) The proposed IAEA treaty or convention must discard precatory language such as "strongly encourage" or "upon request," and replace it with "shall" in order to convey unambiguous regulatory mandates.
Some of them were formulated as precatory exhortations: "Require all politi cal parties and government authorities to respect the independence of the judiciary; with a commitment to discipline any government or party member who undermines the credibility of judges or puts pressure on judicial institutions." In this passage, even though the notion as such of civility in public debate is an elegant and worthy desideratum, the recommendation, expressed in such broad phrasing, implicates obvious free speech issues.
English: Crab's eye, Jequerity, Precatory bean, Rosary pea 16 Acacia catechu (L.
(176) Instead, administrative and judicial decision makers currently decide that certain rules are merely precatory, or that transgressions of other rules are to be forgiven if the transgressions are "minor" or "insubstantial" or not the "fault" of the voter.
(44) See, e.g., Graham O'Donoghue, Precatory Executive Statements and Permissible Judicial Responses in the Context of Holocaust-Claims Litigation, 106 COLUM.
(94) While some laws express eco-centric concerns, they are often stated in introductory or precatory language, not at the enforceable substantive center of the enactments.
In this regard, the recitals contained in the letter are ambiguous and precatory:
Note that the language in this article is not precatory, but imperative.