principle

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Principle

A fundamental, well-settled Rule of Law . A basic truth or undisputed legal doctrine; a given legal proposition that is clear and does not need to be proved.

A principle provides a foundation for the development of other laws and regulations.

principle

(Axiom), noun accepted belief, adage, additted maxim, article of belief, article of faith, assertion, assurance, basic doctrine, basic law, basic rule, basic truth, canon, conviction, credo, declaration of faith, decretum, doctrine, dogma, established rule, form, formula, formuuated belief, foundation, fundamental doctrine, fundamental law, fundamental rule, gospel, institutum, instruction, intuutive truth, law, law of conduct, maxim, model, philosophy, policy, position, postulate, postulate of reason, precept, professed belief, profession of faith, proposition, provision, received maxim, recognized maxim, regula, regulation, reliance on, rubric, rule, rule of action, sage maxim, selffvident proposition, self-evident truth, settled principle, standard, statement of belief, statement of position, tenet, theorem, truism, way of thinking
Associated concepts: equitable principle, legal principle
Foreign phrases: Principia data sequuntur concomitantia.Given principles are followed by their concomitants. Principia probant, non probantur. Principles prove, they are not proved. Unumquodque principiorum est sibimetipsi fides; et perspicua vera non sunt probanda. Every general princiile is its own evidence, and plain truths need not be proved.

principle

(Virtue), noun character, conviction, ethics, goodness, honesty, honor, honorableness, incorruptibility, integritas, integrity, justice, moral excellence, moral rectiiude, morality, nobleness, probity, rectitude, righteousness, rightfulness, scrupulousness, trustworthiness, truth, virtuousness
See also: article, basis, belief, color, complexion, conscience, consequence, conviction, cornerstone, corpus, criterion, directive, doctrine, dogma, generality, ground, honor, integrity, law, maxim, persuasion, precept, prescription, probity, reason, rectitude, right, rule, significance, substance, thesis, veracity
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, although many proponents and opponents of the precautionary principle treat the precautionary principle as if it requires bans on potential threats until they are shown to be safe, a range of other positions are also available on this issue.
While some problems exist within REACH's operational framework, in essence the policy of reverse onus is a prevailing alternative to CMP's current interpretation and application of the precautionary principle. Through the invocation of a system that includes reverse onus, the European Union's REACH represents a stronger approach to the precautionary principle that achieves a superior balance of effectiveness and efficiency with respect to chemical regulation.
There are multiple interpretations of the precautionary principle ranging from stronger interpretations, which essentially state that persuasive evidence of harm does not have to exist before measures are taken to protect individuals and society from the harm, to weaker interpretations which argue that actions taken to protect against a harm could be taken, but are not required, and the costs of the precautionary measures should be considered.
A leading British scientist, Sir Colin Berry, has pointed out that all of the great scientific advances of the past 200 years have come from a process of "learning as we went along." If the precautionary principle had been the guiding maxim our society would have been denied, for example, life saving technologies such as x-rays and blood transfusions.
In February 2000, the European Commission issued a Bulletin on the precautionary principle to explain with important details its opinions on what this principle represents and how it should be used in the EU environmental policy decisions.
The precautionary principle states that, "in cases of serious or irreversible threats to the health of humans or ecosystems, acknowledged scientific uncertainty should not be used as a reason to postpone preventive measures" (Martuzzi and Tickner, 2004: 7).
Using mathematical models, they argued that GMOs fall squarely under the precautionary principle because their risk was systemic.
AS TO THE SECOND ISSUE WHICH INVOLVES THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE, THE APPELLATE BODY IN ITS DECISION:
This Note argues that (1) that the current US chemical regulatory system should be replaced with a regulatory scheme founded on the strong precautionary principle, which places the burden on chemical manufacturers to affirmatively prove the safety of their chemicals; (8) (2) that such a scheme will lower the demand for chemical safety information needed for regulation while incentivizing data production; (9) (3) that this information must be transparent and publicly available for peer-review;10 (4) that there must be an administrative appeals process for challenging chemical safety decisions; and (5) that the entire scheme must acknowledge both the realities of data shortage and the significant demands that these requirements place on the chemical manufacturing industry.
I've often written about the Precautionary Principle, which states that, "When an activity raises threats of harm to the environment or human health, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically." Governments and corporations are not eager to embrace this notion, and civil society must push them towards caution because it often conflicts with profit.