Precedence

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PRECEDENCE. The right of being first placed in a certain order, the first rank being supposed the most honorable.
     2. In this country no precedence is given by law to men.
     3. Nations, in their intercourse with each other, do not admit any precedence; hence in their treaties in one copy one is named first, and the other in the other. In some cases of officers when one must of necessity act as the chief, the oldest in commission will have precedence; as when the president of a court is not present, the associate who has the oldest commission will have a precedence; or if their. commissions bear the same date, then the oldest man.
     4. In. the, army and navy there is an order of precedence which regulates the officers in their command.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
states that "Whitaker's Table of Precedency" probably
De Quincey revels in this state control, embracing the power and using it for his own means: "upholding the morality of the mail, a fortiori I upheld its rights; as a matter of duty, I stretched to the uttermost its privilege of imperial precedency, and astonished weak minds by the feudal powers which I hinted to be lurking constructively in the charters of this proud establishment" (529).
That all Men by Nature are equal, I cannot be supposed to understand all sorts of Equality: Age or Virtue may give Men a just Precedency: Excellency of Parts and Merit may place others above the Common Level: Birth may subject some, and Alliance or Benefits others, to pay an Observance to those to whom Nature, Gratitude or other Respects may have made it due; and yet all this consists with the Equality, which all Men are in, in respect of Jurisdiction or Dominion one over another, which was the Equality I there spoke of, as proper to the Business in hand, being that equal Right that every Man hath, to his Natural Freedom, without being subjected to the Will or Authority of any other Man.
The power and velocity of De Quincey's mail-coach therefore suggest, to different readers, the accelerated mental activity of the opium addict; the element of temporal succession or narrative movement which it is the function of art to arrest in permanent form; a poststructuralist notion of language as a machine running out of control and answerable to neither writer nor reader; a lost past of organic harmony; the destructive power of modern technology; the reckless, unprincipled character of political leadership; the 'imperial precedency' ('The English Mail-Coach', p.
No contest passed, as was usual on the like occasions, for Precedency, the Muscovites freely giving it to the Poles.
No society, whether barbarous or civilized, has ever found it convenient to settle the rules of precedency of rank and subordination, according to those invisible qualities; but according to something that is more plain and palpable.(67) Citizen suits give environmental groups disproportionate access to courts relative to alleged violators.