prejudiced


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Democrats toward Republicans and vice versa), and it does not mean one is prejudiced, only uneasy around members of these out groups.
In 2001, 25 per cent of people said they were "very" or "a little" racially prejudiced.
London, May 28( ANI ): Natives of Britain have admitted to be prejudiced racially and the number has increased raising concerns over social community relations and widespread hostility towards immigrants.
They are under the illusion that, because they have no racial prejudice, they are not prejudiced.
more racially diverse jury, [so] Williams was actually prejudiced by the
We also discovered that being prejudiced toward Jews makes a person more likely to express prejudice toward Muslims than any other factor studied.
Prejudice is also difficult to evaluate because in modern democratic societies there have been systematic campaigns against prejudice, racism, and xenophobia which have led people to seek to appear to be tolerant without abandoning their prejudiced attitudes (Gaertner & Dovidio, 1977; Meertens & Pettigrew, 1997; Saucier, Miller, & Doucet, 2005).
Indeed, with some people, you must question whether they really do realise that their words and actions are prejudiced and do cause serious offence.
ONE in three Scots think it is acceptable to be prejudiced, a shock report revealed yesterday.
9100-3, because he acted reasonably and in good faith and the government's interests would not be prejudiced.
I have a very strong, old-fashioned view that if you are properly educated, it is almost impossible to be prejudiced.
may give rise to a covered Loss, provided, however, that the 120-day deadline for performance will be extended to the benefit of the defaulting party and to the detriment of the non-defaulting party for so long as the non-defaulting party is not appreciably prejudiced thereby.