prescribe punishment

References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps, India should think of having a Permanent National Judicial Commission to appoint higher judiciary and also probe complaints against judges and prescribe punishment to the ones found guilty.
In order to prescribe punishment for the preaching and practice of Untouchability for the enforcement of any disability arising therefrom and for matters connected therewith, the Protection of Civil Rights Act, 1955 has been enacted.
2) For the knowing commission of any act of sex trafficking involving force, fraud, coercion, or in which the victim of sex trafficking is a child incapable of giving meaningful consent, or of trafficking which includes rape or kidnapping or which causes a death, the government of the country should prescribe punishment commensurate with that for grave crimes, such as forcible sexual assault.
Enabling legislation was now required to be adopted to define torture and prescribe punishment for it.
Imran Khan said that the only way to counter this is for the Muslim Ummah to act in a concerted fashion and make sure that laws are passed in Western countries that prescribe punishment for those ridiculing religions or religious beliefs of Muslims.
One of the laws, he further explained, is a bill that seeking to prohibit and prescribe punishment for corruption and other related offences, giving the Anti-Corruption Commission the responsibility to investigation and prosecution of offenders.
CONDEMN - the English dictionary states: 1, To declare to be utterly reprehensible, wrong or evil; 2a, To prescribe punishment for, to sentence to death; 2b, To sentence, doom; 3, To declare unfit for use or consumption.
In those rare cases where it seems that not punishing an innocent offender would seriously threaten the systemic values, a deontologist may either prescribe punishment of the innocent for the sake of protecting the systemic values, or, better, according to Hurd, consider the offender to be in fact guilty for seriously threatening them with his disobedience.
In November 2009, Parliament passed the Child Act which prohibits but does not prescribe punishment for forced child labor.
The Government of Portugal did not provide full statistical evidence of its law enforcement efforts, and it failed to prescribe punishment sufficiently stringent to deter trafficking in Portugal; virtually all convictions for trafficking resulted in suspended sentences in 2004.
Malin claimed the Criminal Code must match the Constitution in that regard, and said that other changes will also prescribe punishments for acts soon to be outlawed by the new constitutional amendments.
One of the proposals is stated to grade the age and prescribe punishments commensurate with the crime.