prestidigitation

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prestidigitation

noun conjuring, deluding, illusion, juggling, legerdemain, magic, palming, sleight of hand, sorcery, trickery
References in periodicals archive ?
Beauvoir emerges from this excessive resistant reading as less the skilled prestidigitator and executor of a literary deception than the paradoxical victim of the text's very vulnerability to shifts in meaning that she has tried to exploit.
The question has always been whether Stoppard is anything more than clevercleverclever--is he simply a prestidigitator of prose and a joke mechanic, a whiz kid staging fantastically elaborate intellectual collisions as if they were toy-train wrecks?
The prestidigitator moved back to the checkout area and began to work his magic on them.
Together, these three disparate characters have concocted a provocative, virtually unprecedented cabaret act in which their individual specialties -- Zabrecky's Lynchian mentalism, Lovering's self-coined "scientific phenomenalism" (armed with an engineering degree, he had a job building lasers before the Pixies lured him away) and whatever it is that postmodern prestidigitator Fitzgerald does -- are eerily interconnected.
With his tricks, the prestidigitator invites his spectators to participate in full awareness that they are voluntarily submitting to a deception, like every intellectual construction, in order to experience the pure existence of things as if for the first time.
Adapted and directed by TV commercials ace Neil Burger from Pulitzer winner Steven Millhauser's short story ``Eisenheim the Illusionist,'' the movie stars Edward Norton as the title prestidigitator.
I'd prefer to believe it was one last rabbit out of the hat of the Findon prestidigitator.
Beck expresses herself in a shorthand staccato, eschewing grammar for immediacy, juggling words like a prestidigitator, reveling in alliteration and contrapuntal dialogue.
A male prestidigitator performs a series of tricks using cards whose backs are blocks of primary colors--the kind of cards Mondrian might have used had he been a sleight-of-hand man--and a younger female assistant tries her hand at a few of the same.
In the midst of this global turmoil, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, UBS, Deutsche Bank, Citibank, JP Morgan Chase, and their ilk--eminent institutions all--are full of dazzling financial prestidigitators.
It was clearly an act of group hypnotism, which quite a number of prestidigitators can also easily and breezily pull off-but, what about the individual factor?